Posts Tagged Email

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Why and How to Use QR Codes in Healthcare

A QR Code for managemypractice.com

As healthcare embraces technology to improve patient outcomes, streamline operations, and lower costs, the technologies with the most impact are the ones that Make Things Simpler.

 

 

 

One of the most basic ways to simplify a complex process to is remove friction

The electronic medical record removes the friction of paper records – finding, handling, storing, and securing them – all the things that can get between the critical information on the page and the physician who needs it. A smartphone removes the friction of needing to be near a desktop to read and send email, get contact information, and securely access practice and hospital documents and patient data. This technology provides value by simplifying a process to its core so that time, effort and resources are not wasted on mishaps, transportation, and basic human inertia.

Now, think about your practice’s web content: the basic information and elevator pitch about your services that you want to communicate to existing and future patients. Your content is the reason you have a website in the first place and you should always be looking for ways to get eyeballs in front of it. Email lists, Facebook and Twitter, direct mail and practice brochures are all designed to connect people with your content to drive business to your practice. If someone sees a link to your content while they’re at their computer, then the only friction you’ll encounter is getting them to click to go to your page.

But what about all the mobile time your potential customers spend?

If they see an advertisement – TV, billboard, print – that has the URL (web address) you want to send them to, they will have to bypass a lot of potential friction before they see your content. They have to:

  • Commit to going to the website later
  • Remember the URL, and why they wanted to go to in the first place
  • Follow through with this commitment and remember how and why they wanted to go to the page
  • Type the URL into a browser

With social media and email campaigns that are usually accessed through internet enabled PCs or mobile devices, a simple link enables you to bypass all of this potential friction because there’s a fairly good chance that your customer will either click the link immediately, or possibly bookmark it to check it out later (enabling a much easier recall). But with print, public, and televised advertising campaigns the odds are the customer doesn’t have either:

  1. An internet enabled device on them at the moment, or
  2. The time or inclination to check out the website immediately- and if they did, they would encounter more friction typing the address into their mobile.

So how can you overcome this friction, and get the benefits of the simplicity of a link in a “real world” marketing situation? One way is with Quick Response (QR) codes.

A QR code is a two-dimensional barcode that can be quickly and easily read by a fairly simple piece of software to communicate a piece of information: text, or a phone number or other contact information, or a web address to direct a phone’s web browser. Most of the QR Codes themselves are a small jumble of black and white pixelated dots that sort of resemble a “digital bacteria” or some sort of computer life form. But in many ways, Quick Response (or QR) codes are like hyperlinks that exist in our physical lives. By installing a small program on your phone, and then taking a picture of the code with your phone, you can immediately access the information embedded within.

  • See a newspaper ad about a sale at one of your favorite stores, and scan the QR code to get a link to a coupon for an additional discount, or to register to be told about other upcoming sales.
  • See a TV commercial about a new restaurant, where scanning the code on TV leads your phone to a website to make reservations for dinner, or receive a special two-for-one deal.
  • See a poster at a health fair booth and scan the QR code to get an instant calculator app that gives you easy exercise options for someone your age with your level of physical fitness.

By removing the friction of telling someone about web content without giving them the ability to access it automatically, QR Codes lubricate the entire person education process. A QR Code on a brochure can facilitate initial contact with the patient by sending them to a website to get more information, or book an appointment, whereas a phone number to call with more info, or even just the practice’s web address means a patient is left to go the rest of the way on their own. On top of that, a QR code is a simple and effective way to improve your image as an organization on both a technical and user friendly front, and QR codes are flexible enough to handle a lot of different applications in your practice:

  • Flyers about annual checkup services: (blood pressure, weight management, mammograms) that your patients see as they leave (often when most motivated to seek additional services) can include links to more information (general info sites, government warnings, approved resource sites, treatment communities) or redirect to content on your site or blog.
  • Advertisements for surgical procedures and contain codes to access before and after pictures and patient testimonials, or to a landing page to submit requests for more information.

By streamlining the process of fulfilling a patient’s request to “tell me more”, QR Codes give practices an easy (and did I mention free) way to build relationships, influence patient health choices and outcomes, direct patients to the content you choose for them, and even send the message that your practice is on the leading edge of technology.

Five steps to start using QR codes in your practice right away

  1. Decide how QR Codes fit into your overall marketing and education effort. Which real-world situations do you want to link to web content?
  2. Setting up a QR plan doesn’t have to involve a big up-front expense. Use free programs like Kaywa (http://qrcode.kaywa.com/) to generate codes for your campaigns, and free readers like i-nigma for iPhone (http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/i-nigma-4-qr-datamatrix-barcode/id388923203?mt=8) and QRDroid for Android (https://market.android.com/details?id=la.droid.qr) to get started right away
  3. Think carefully about where you place the codes themselves. You want people to have access to the info, without making the code itself the center of the message. The code is the link to more, not the point of the marketing effort. And make sure people can see and frame the code easily enough that they don’t struggle to scan it. Don’t add friction now!
  4. Don’t assume everyone knows what the code is, or what to do with it. Give them a clear call to action, complete with instructions. “Scan this code with a QR reader to receive (learn more, find out, book now…)”
  5. Make sure the payoff at the other end of the code is worth the effort. Give them some real value for their scan. It could be a discount, it could be exclusive, valuable, it could be a frictionless way to make an appointment with you (win-win!), but don’t have people scan  if the effort won’t be rewarded with real value.

 

Posted in: Innovation, Practice Marketing, Social Media

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Readers & Colleagues Comment on “101 Ideas for Increasing Revenue and Decreasing Expenses”

I invited readers of MMP, colleagues on LinkedIn, and Tweeps (friends on Twitter) to comment on my post “101 ideas for Increasing Revenue and Decreasing Expenses.” I’ve listed their ideas below and hope you’ll chime in on the comments with even more ideas!  Thanks to everyone for contributing.

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David Kirkup 

David Kirkup

Partner at B2B CFO® – Experienced CFO for Rent. Fast, Effective, Affordable.

Consider adding a part-time CFO to the mix. Many medical offices have very weak financial capability or understanding. Assistance can range from better financial reports, capital expenditure analysis, budgeting and exit plans.

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Bobby Jones

Eastern Region Sales Manager – Billing Tree

1) Build a relationship with the patient before he/she leaves the practice.
2) Make sure they know you are expecting payment on the portion they owe, and when you are expecting that payment.
3) Let them know what your process is for collecting, and when they will go to an outside agency.
4) Enable a web site to take payments 24 hours a day.
5) Set up an IVR system to take phone payments after hours.
6) Communicate your available payment acceptance methods in writing, on the phone and every time you speak with your patients.
7) Send the invoice or statement when you intend to send it.
8) Re-inforce the payment acceptance methods on the first and any subsequent invoices.
9) Adopt a plan for following up with any patients that don’t pay after 10 days.
10) Get email addresses from all of your patients and their permission to contact them in that manner.

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Sukrit Tripathy

Sr. Product/Process Trainer and EDI Implementation Consultant

One suggestion would be to integrate the revenue cycle mangement function with your clearinghouse {for electronic billing} with integrated solutions like Coding database and Updates, Industry Broadcast, Performance and Audit reports for Claim Edits, Transmission and Rejects. Also, better training resources for billing staff actively into the practice management system.

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Barbara Rotter

Consultant at Pacific Women’s Medical Group

I would add effective cash management (even if interest rates are so low).

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Michael Glass

Michael Glass

Medical and Business Consultant at Transworld Systems

Utilize a Flat Fee Collections Agency for Non-responsive Patient Pay concerns.

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Randall Shulkin

Principal Consultant – Culbert Healthcare Solutions

– Do you collect co-payments on the way in rather than on the way out?
– Does your PM/Scheduling system show the patient co-payment and outstanding patient balance in the appointment screen? If not, then can you download a listing for your front desk staff?

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Denise Price Thomas

Denise Price Thomas

DPT Healthcare Consulting & Training

I’d like to add “acknowledge the patient with eye contact” and offer “polished customer service” and they will WANT to return = return on your $ $

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Stacy Mays

Managing Partner, Dynamic Grape Companies

One other thought… don’t be afraid to try new technology. For example, one of my clients has developed a kiosk that allows patients to take their own weight and bp and electronically feeds the data into their EMR. The whole set up costs about $3500 and can save a ton of staff time. Tele-health in general should also be considered.

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Angela Short

VP at Operations

If you select a reasonably priced EMR and you implement enhancements then you more than save on staff cost. Keep in mind that my practice rolled out the EMR five years ago, so we have had time to get it right. Here are some of the savings/revenue opportunities:1. We utilize our electronic technology to send text messages and emails to our patients to remind them of their appointments. This function alone saves my practice one FTE. Not only do we save with staff time we improve patient satisfaction, as our Blackberry users loves the email or text that they can directly add to their calendars. The revenue enhancement to this function, we decrease no shows and lag time in our physician’s schedules.

2. The robust reporting within the EMR allows the organization to assemble important quality measures that we use in contract negotiations. Without the EMR this would be a labor intensive task.

3. We are able to push a secure message to our patients regarding their pathology results saving staff time on the telephone and increasing patient satisfaction by eliminating a visit just to obtain a normal result.

4. No more chasing charts for a phone message. My call center takes ALL clinical messages. This is attached to the patient’s electronic chart and routed to either a nurse to respond or a physician. This process greatly reduces staff time, decreases the time it takes to respond to the patient’s issue and provides a legal record of the telephone call which is often missed in a paper environment.

5. We receive a discount on our mal-practice insurance because in an electronic environment it is guarantee that your notes are legible.

6. The formulary function built into most EMR’s provides the physician will a real time snapshot if a prescription that he/she is about to write is covered by the patient’s health plan and provides alternatives if available.

I have just highlighted only a couple examples of the administrative benefits. There are many more. It is tough to imagine going back to a paper chart.

I have done the math and we could cover our current EMR with the incentives offered through the government initiative.

I will comment that physicians need to be trained on how to use the EMR. You can lose site of the patient and focus the entire visit on the computer versus the patient, however, we teach our physicians that the patient first and then chart completion. We conduct patient satisfaction surveys and I rarely receive a complaint regarding the physician’s time at the computer. I do however, receive praises from patients regarding the ePrescribe as it decreases their wait times when the arrive at the pharmacy, the prescription is ready.

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Okay Readers, it’s your turn – what’s your secret weapon for increasing revenue or decreasing expenses?

Mary Pat

Posted in: Collections, Billing & Coding, Day-to-Day Operations, Electronic Medical Records, Finance, Innovation, Medicare & Reimbursement

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The 5 IT Skillsets Every Physician Practice Manager Needs to Succeed in 2009 and Beyond

I wrote this article for the Physician Office Managers Association of America (POMAA) March/April 2009 Newletter.  If you don’t know POMAA, check out their website.

The Road to Success © Matt Trommer | Dreamstime.com

Each of us have areas of expertise based on our experience, our education and what we find interesting and fun.  IT knowledge and skills are no longer optional, however, and I suggest every medical practice manager learn as much as possible about the following five areas.  Your work life and the life of your practice may depend on it!

Skill 1: Email Etiquette and Management

Email can rule your work life if you don’t make good choices with your messages.  Managers need to know how to use the Rules Tool (Outlook) to automatically move messages into folders, and how to turn emails into Tasks and Appointments.  Work communication can succeed or fail if you don’t have the basics under your command.  Knowing how to archive your email will not only save you time when looking for important information, but will save you from the frustration of searching through hundreds of emails.  Here are the basics of email management:

  1. Most organizational experts recommend looking at your email twice a day, and turning off the setting that notifies you immediately when you have new email.  Email can be very addictive, and can suck your time away from projects and other work.
  2. Just like paper, try to only touch an email once.  Once you read the email, decide whether to delete it, answer/forward it and delete it, or do something else with it like dragging it to the task list or calendar.  Don’t get caught in the ugly cycle of reading it once, and going on to the next email without doing anything about it.  If you do that, you’ll end up with lots of emails that you have to read again…and maybe a third time.
  3. Never put anything critical (of a criticizing nature) in an email.  If you need to have that type of conversation with a colleague, pick up the phone.  A critique to an employee is best done in person, with a follow-up email for the file.
  4. Always check your outgoing email for tone.  The best tone for business email is professional. This means a greeting, a message, a “thank you” and footer with your full name, title, and contact information.  Some organizations are more formal, and some are less formal, but I would err on the side of being more professional.  You can always set your email signature to include the greeting and thank you and your name, so all you have to do is complete the middle.
  5. For emails that do need to be saved for reference, make subfolders under your Inbox to place reference email. Even better, copy the email to a Word document, and delete the email.
  6. Have high priority (your boss or bosses) and low priority (listservs, subscriptions) email automatically come into their own folders.  The low priority email can wait and the high priority email can be dealt with first.
  7. Group emails with jokes, homespun wisdom, clever tests and unbelievable pictures are a waste of your time.  If you need a break from work, go for a walk, but get rid of the group emails.  They take personal and server email space and can border on or be outright offensive, causing a problem if you don’t nip it in the bud.  Remember that email is legally discoverable.
  8. Be careful about answering emails off the top of your head, possibly when you’re angry, or rushed.  If you need to delay answering an email because of your mood, drag the email over to the task list and set the to-do for tomorrow.

Medical Nurse

Skill 2: Understanding Medical Office Software

Acronyms come and go, but the basic software that supports medical practices remains the same.  Practice Management Systems (PMS) typically include registration, scheduling, billing and reporting as one component.  Today’s systems are built around the billing function, with scheduling and registration supporting the ability to generate electronic claims and post payments back to the transactions.  Because billing is becoming more standardized, it is the reporting that can make or break a practice.

Electronic Medical Records (EMR) are sometimes referred to in a broader sense as EHR (Electronic Health Records) and range from the simplest of systems which act as a repository for the electronic chart to the most sophisticated systems which may include  digital imaging, e-prescribing, complex messaging, medication reconciliation, and test alerting, among others.  EMR and PMS can be totally integrated, or can interface with each other, populating the other uni-directionally or bi-directionally.  Those mangers with a deeper understanding of their own software systems will find it easier to implement pay for performance measures such as PQRI and e-prescribing, and will not have to rely on vendors to educate them.

PACS is Picture Archiving and Communication System and allows easy indexing and retrieval of images.  PACS exists primarily in radiology and surgical specialty offices, but as more hospitals extend EMR and PACS privileges to physician offices, managers will need to understand something about the technology.

Other systems that will interface to your system are transcription, outsourced billing systems, data warehouses, claims clearinghouse, electronic posting systems, and web services interfaces.  Get or make a graphic representation of your software and hardware system/network so you can talk knowledgeably about it and understand the effects of adding new servers, workstations or software modules.

Computer Savvy Daniel Sroga | Dreamstime.com

Skill 3: Using Technology to Stay Current in Your Field

Magazines, newspapers and even television news is losing favor as people find the latest and most in-depth news on the Internet.  For physician office managers, news and important information is available through websites, newsletters, newsfeeds, webinars, podcasts, listservs and blogs. How does a manager sift through all these options and stay current with the demand of running a day-to-day practice?

One of the most important ways to consolidate this information is to subscribe to a feedreader or email from websites you like and have the news come to you (called “push technology”), instead of you checking the website every few days or whenever you remember (aka “pull technology”). These are the programs that will eventually do away with most, if not all, of your magazine subscriptions.  You know that guilty pile of professional magazines that you have in your office or at home that you have scanned but still plan to read in-depth?  Gone!

Most websites offer email or RSS options to their users.  An email option asks you to enter your email address and will email you when new information is available, typically offering the full content inside the email itself.  This is ideal for anyone who has these emails automatically placed into an email subfolder to read later.

RSS stand for Really Simple Syndication and is a way to push the content of many sites into a feedreader, which is an organizer of website feeds.  There are many feedreaders available at no cost and adding a new website feed to your personal feedreader is as simple as clicking on the orange RSS icon on the website page and identifying the feedreader you use.  The nice thing about using RSS is that you can group sites into categories you decide upon, it is easy to add new sites and drop sites that you find a waste of your time, and you do not clog up your email program with lots of emails.

Webinars and podcasts are another way to stay current. Many webinars are free and allow you to dip your toe into the pool of knowledge on a particular topic.  Webinars with a fee attached are usually longer and more in-depth, and can replace the traditional go-to conference which has become a budget breaker for many practices.

eBooks are quickly becoming the way to get just the information you want when you want it.  Most eBooks are reasonably priced (some are free) and can be stored or printed.

Patient Emailing His DoctorSkill 4: Online Patient Interactions and Web 2.0 Applications

Patient interactivity via practice websites is growing exponentially.  Many practices are using web functionality to communicate with their patients via secure messaging.  This allows bi-directional communication such as:

1.      Request an appointment (patient) or appointment reminders (practice)

2.      Send statements;  patients pay online with a credit card (practice & patient)

3.      Inform patients of test results (practice)

4.      Create personal health records (patient)

5.      Request a prescription refill (patient)

6.      Virtual office visits (practice & patient)

7.      Complete registration via fillable .pdf forms and download to practice management system (practice & patient)

8.      Request medical records; send an electronic copy of same (practice & patient)

9.      Complete a history of present illness prior to the on-site visit (patient)

10.  Ask & answer questions for the doctor, nurse, or staff (patient & practice)

If you’re not looking into ways to communicate with your patients electronically, start now.  Web 2.0 is now more typically referred to as social networking, social media or new media. What started out as a way for friends to communicate with each other is now an amazing, ever-expanding ability to connect/market to businesses, patients and referrers.  Very few medical practices are using social media, but they should, because it is the way of the future, and in many cases, very affordable.

Knowledge Management & Retention ©Dmitriy Shironosov/Dreamstime.com

Skill 5: Knowledge Management and Retention

Most medical offices try hard to document processes such as “How To Make An Appointment For Dr. Jones,” but find it difficult to keep up with documenting changes to those written protocols.  Documentation is crucial for operations in that it supports job performance and consistency, and is a basis for training new employees.  The traditional documentation method for most practices is use of Word documents, which can create an immediate usability logjam.  Due to cost, Microsoft Office is not installed on many workstations, and many office employees are not trained to use Word, so the onus for original creation of and changing of protocols falls to one person.  Changes in healthcare are happening so quickly that it is not reasonable for one person to be able to update all documentation, unless they are dedicated to it on a full-time basis.

Better and more affordable solutions are becoming available.  Speech recognition and office wikis are two possibilities for documenting office processes.  Speech recognition (you may already be using it for your transcription) is a very affordable solution, but it does take time to train the program to recognize your voice.  If you are not used to dictating, it may also be a learning curve, but it is one that will pay dividends down the road.  Doctors can use it to help you by dictating their preferences, such as appointments, patient intake, room set-up, procedure set-up, patient phone protocol and after-hours call contact protocol.

Private wikis are another good bargain in the marketplace, as many are available at no cost, and may be installed and managed on the web.  Wikis need at least one person to function as editor. Since you can have your entire staff work on documentation, the staff becomes very invested in the process of keeping the wiki fresh and up-to-date.

There are other free or low-cost project management web programs that can also be used to track changes and remind staff to document changes later.  The one area that is most important for tracking changes and managing knowledge in the practice is in billing.  Many practices are held hostage by their billers as their knowledge is so specific and proprietary that the manager feels s/he could not recoup it if they left.  No practice should be vulnerable based on knowledge any single employee has, including the manager.

I am very interested in technology that creates value in medical office practices.  If you are using something new and different in your practice, please email me and let me know.  Also, if you have any questions about the ideas I discuss in this article, I am glad to answer them: marypatwhaley@gmail.com.

Posted in: A Career in Practice Management, Electronic Medical Records, Learn This: Technology Answers

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Monday Special: Get Some Advice From A Slacker Manager

Careful with that keyboard!

Browsing the Web (as I usually do most Sunday nights deciding what to write about for my Monday Special) I tripped over the site “Slacker Manager” and immediately liked it!  The post from Slacker Manager Phil Gerbyshak that caught my eye was one on writing effective emails. Here is an exerpt:

1) Use the subject line in your e-mail for initial clarity and add as much information as you can without making it too long.

Example: Subject: Need your answer by Tuesday March 1st at 3 PM

2) Consistently use the To line for all those who you require a response from, and put those who need the information but don’t need to respond, in the CC line.

Example: If you want a response from John, Jane and Sam, but you want to make sure Sally and Tom know the information, you put John, Jane and Sam in the To line, and Sally and Tom on the CC line. Simple, huh?

3) State the main point in the first sentence of the e-mail so folks don’t have to guess what you’re trying to say.

Example: We have 2 options for a meeting date: Friday March 5th at 3:00 PM or Monday March 7th at 10 AM. Please respond with your preference by Tuesday March 1st at 3 PM.”

These are the bare bones, so visit his site for the rest of the article and many more great topics.

I would add these ideas to his list:

Use the high importance flag sparingly.

Do not use the bcc. I think it’s sneaky and rarely warranted.  If you want to share something with someone, add them to the cc.

Don’t ever say anything in an email that would embarrass you if your Mom read it, or could get you fired if your Boss read it.  Remember, email is forever.

NOTE: Slacker Manager does not seem to be publishing as of November 2009, but the linke to b5media above is still active.

Posted in: Day-to-Day Operations

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What a Patient Said to Me When He Found Out I Manage a Physician Practice

He said, “I’m looking for a doctor that uses email.”  He said he would not use a doctor that doesn’t use email because he doesn’t have the time to fool around on the phone when he needs an appointment or has a question.  Of course, in the practice, we don’t have time to fool around on the phone either, and we’d LOVE to do everything via email, but this is something that seems hard to implement.

Why?

  1. Everyone (including me) is uncertain about privacy and HIPAA when communicating with patients electronically.
  2. Everyone (including me) worries about the liability issues related to electronic communication with patients.  How do you index it on the EMR?  Do you print it out if you’re using paper charts?
  3. Systems that are designed to facilitate email with patients seem limited and restricted as to specific uses like making appointments.
  4. Managers worry that email opens the door to patient communication falling through the cracks when we/they are already working very hard to keep that from happening.
  5. Most wonder if it is worth adopting technology early when it’s expensive and untried.
  6. Most wonder how many patients would really communicate electronically if given the chance.

If you could design a safe, low-risk system to communicate electronically with your patients, what would be the uses for this system? What are your communication logjams? Are you aware of or using any systems that have cracked the electronic communication conundrum?

Here’s another article on doctors using email: Why Doctors Don’t Email Patients.

Photo by Andi Berger/Dreamstime.com

Posted in: Innovation

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Online Surveys Help You Find Out What Everyone is Thinking

I am about to use SurveyMonkey again.  The first time I used SurveyMonkey was to ask the staff questions about benefits.  I knew that we were facing some big health insurance premium increases and I wanted to know what employees’ priorities were.  SurveyMonkey walked me through the process of designing a simple survey (10 questions) and compiled the results for me.

I presented the results of the survey at my first quarterly staff meeting and discussed what my challenges were in trying to meet the needs of the employees and the needs of the organization in choosing a health plan.  The use of the survey tool and my discussion of the results let the staff know that their feedback counts.

Now, we’re designing a new office and I am soliciting information (not anonymous this time) about what people value in a workspace and what their needs are for technology and comfort.  Feedback from the staff is that they like being asked what they think and enjoy the surveys.  Feedback from me is that SurveyMonkey is easy to use and at $20.00 per month for unlimited surveys, it’s a tool that delivers the value.

Here are some other ways you might use surveys:

  • Put a survey on your practice website.
  • Put a survey on a computer monitor or tablet in your reception area.
  • Send a survey to patients via email.
  • Ask the staff or docs at referring physician practices to complete a quick survey about the service you provide to their patients.
  • If you’ve sent patients for tests, therapy or surgery, have them complete a survey about their experiences.
  • Have a computer for surveys at health fairs asking visitors to participate for a chance to win a prize.
  • Add a link on all marketing materials to a community survey.

What are your survey ideas?

Photo credit: Dmitry Maslov | Dreamstime.com

Posted in: Innovation

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Grownup Back to School: Make Fall a Time to Reorganize Your Virtual Backpack and Pencilbox

LifeHacker had a great post today that I thought was worth sharing.  It’s about using the change of seasons as a catalyst to get yourself reconoitered and back on track.  The article advises you to:

  • De-clutter your computer
  • Empty your Inbox – he uses the trusted trio of Followup, Archive and Hold.  I like Followup, and Do Not Delete and Archive.
  • Reorganize your paper filing cabinet
  • Teach yourself keyboard shortcuts (*My son taught me Ctrl+C (copy) and Ctrl+V (paste) not too long ago and I have no idea how I ever did anything without these two friends – try them instead of using right click or tool bar icons and you might be surprised how automatic it becomes and how fast it is)
  • Consolidate your email addresses, phone numbers, and calendars

Here are my additions to the list:

  • Learn three things about Excel that you continue to do the long/hard way because you’re too busy to learn the shortcut (yes, I’m talking to myself here.)  Try this siteor this one.
  • Catch up on your shredding (at home I have a box of to-do shredding, and a to-be shredded drawer that needs emptied – yes, I’m talking to myself again.)
  • Reorganize your online filing cabinet – here’s a great beginner article about files and folders, and here’s a short video tutorial from Expert Village on organizing files in Windows.
  • Delete unneeded email or understand archiving – here’s a website with information on using AutoArchive in Outlook (me again.)

What’s your secret weapon to getting/staying organized and ahead of the information deluge?

Posted in: Learn This: Technology Answers

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