Posts Tagged Medicare Part C

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2013 Medicare Parts A, B, C and D Deductibles and Premiums

The Part B Medicare deductible for 2013 is $147.00.

Medicare Premiums for 2013 Are Here! Celebrate with cake!

What should you do with this information? You should avoid taking a big financial hit in the first quarter of 2013 by collecting deductibles at time of service. How do you do that?

  • Let all patients know in advance that you collect deductibles by making it part of your communication with them. Put it in your financial policy (get a copy of my preferred financial policy below), put it on your website, and let patients know when you schedule their appointment, or make an appointment reminder with verbiage like:

“We look forward to seeing you at your appointment. Please bring your insurance cards and all medications to your visit. We will collect your co-pay, your deductible, and any co-insurance required by your insurance plan.”

  • Explain what a deductible is. Get my sample patient handout explaining deductibles below.
  • Train front desk staff on deductibles and get them comfortable discussing deductibles with patients and answering their questions.
  • Do not collect deductibles for Medicare patients who also have Medicaid, or for Medicare patients with supplemental insurance as there most likely will not be a balance that the patient will owe.
  • It is ideal to use a Credit Card On File program to charge the patient’s credit card at time of service, or when the EOB (Explanation of Benefits) arrives in 15 days.

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Posted in: Collections, Billing & Coding, Day-to-Day Operations, Medicare & Reimbursement, Medicare This Week

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Medicare for 2010: Deductibles and Premiums Update

Medicare is a federal health insurance program created in 1965 for:

  • people age 65 or older,
  • people under age 65 with certain disabilities, and
  • people of all ages with End-Stage Renal Disease (permanent kidney failure requiring dialysis or a kidney transplant)

Medicare Part A – 99% of patients don’t pay a premium for Part A (hospital insurance) because they or a spouse already paid for it through their payroll taxes while working. The ,100 deductible for 2010, paid by the beneficiary when admitted as a hospital inpatient, is an increase from 2009.   Part A helps cover:

  • inpatient care in hospitals (excluding the physician fees), including critical access hospitals
  • skilled nursing facilities (not custodial or long-term care)
  • some hospice care
  • some home health care


Medicare Part B
– Part B (outpatient/doctor insurance) base premium for 2010: .40/month (no change from 2009.)  Premiums are higher for single people over 65 making more than K per year and for couples making over 0K.  Part B premiums cover approximately one-fourth of the average cost of Part B services incurred by beneficiaries aged 65 and over.  The remaining Part B costs are financed by Federal general revenues.  In 2010, the Part B deductible is 5.  Part B helps cover:

  • physician fees in the hospital
  • physician fees in their offices and other outpatient locations
  • other outpatient services (x-rays, lab services)
  • some services of physical and occupational therapists
  • some home health care

Medicare Part C – Medicare now offers beneficiaries the option to have care paid for through private insurance plans.  These private insurance options are part of Medicare Part C, which was previously known as Medicare+Choice, and is now called Medicare Advantage. Medicare Advantage expands options for receiving Medicare coverage through a variety of private insurance plans, including private fee-for-service (PFFS) plans, local health maintenance organizations (HMOs) and regional preferred provider organizations (PPOs), and through new mechanisms such as medical savings accounts (MSAs), as well as adding payment for additional services not covered under Part A or B.

Medicare Part D –  Starting January 1, 2006, Medicare prescription drug coverage became available to everyone with Medicare.  The so-called “doughnut hole” is the amount the patient pays between the initial coverage limit of ,830 and the out-of-pocket threshold of ,550 – a total of 20 that the patient is responsible for.

  • Initial Deductible: 0
  • Initial Coverage Limit: ,830
  • Out-of-Pocket Threshold: ,550


COMPARISON OF MEDICARE PLANS

Original Medicare Plan

WHAT? The traditional pay-per-visit (also called fee-for-service) arrangement available nationwide.

HOW? Providers can choose to participate (“par”) or not participate (“non-par”.)  Participating providers accept the Medicare allowable and collect co-insurance (20% of the allowable.) Reimbursement comes to the providers.  Non-participating providers may charge 15% more (called the “limiting” charge) than the Medicare allowable schedule, but the patient will receive the check, which is why some non-par practices require payment at time of service for Medicare patients. To be able to charge patients for non-covered services, patients must sign an ABN before the service is provided.

Original Medicare Plan With Supplemental Medigap Policy

WHAT? The Original Medicare Plan plus one of up to ten standardized Medicare supplemental insurance policies (also called Medigap insurance) available through private companies.

HOW? Medigap plans may cover Medicare deductibles and co-insurance, but typically will not cover anything Medicare will not.  Medicare primary claims will “cross-over” to many Medigap secondary claims so the practice does not have to file the secondary Medigap claim.  Patients may still have a small balance that is cost-prohibitive to bill for.

Medicare Coordinated Care Plan

WHAT? A Medicare approved network of doctors, hospitals, and other health care providers that agrees to give care in return for a set monthly payment from Medicare. A coordinated care plan may be any of the following: a Health Maintenance Organization (HMO), Provider Sponsored Organization (PSO), local or regional Preferred Provider Organization (PPO), or a Health Maintenance Organization (HMO) with a Point of Service Option (POS).

HOW? You have to have signed a contract or be grandfathered in (called an “all-products” clause) under an existing contract to see patients and get paid. Primary care providers may have to provide referrals and/or authorization for specialty services and providers. A PPO or a POS plan usually provides out of network benefits for patients for an extra out-of pocket cost.

Private Fee-For-Service Plan (PFFS)

WHAT? A Medicare-approved private insurance plan. Medicare pays the plan a premium for Medicare-covered services. A PFFS Plan provides all Medicare benefits. Note: This is not the same as Medigap.

HOW? Most PFFS plans allow patients to be seen by any provider who will see them. PFFS plans do not have to pay providers according to the prevailing Medicare fee schedule or pay in 15 days for clean claims.  Providers may bill patients more than the plan pays, up to a limit. It would be a good thing to notify patients if your practice intends to bill above the plan payment.

Need more?  Click on CMS (provider-oriented) or Medicare (patient-oriented.)

Posted in: Day-to-Day Operations, Finance, Medicare & Reimbursement

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