Posts Tagged electronic medical record


Wearables Will Soon Be Part of Major Shift In Medical Practice

For a long time the idea of wearable health tracking devices seemed like an idea out of science fiction, but these days the technology is real and cost effective, and wearables will have a big effect on how your practice operates. Here with more insight on the nascent wearable industry is Guest Author Anne Zieger, CEO of Zieger Healthcare. – Abe

For most doctors in private practice, the astonishing growth of health wearables has all but passed them by.

Wearable Technology Will Soon be a Major Part of Medical PracticeAccording to a leading health IT group, the use of health and fitness apps is growing 87% faster than the entire mobile industry. That’s pretty astonishing for a product category most of us hadn’t even heard of five years ago.

But to date, this hasn’t changed medical practice much. While physicians may review readings gathered by consumer-grade measurement devices such as home glucose meters, blood pressure cuffs and pulse oximeters, few are integrating data from wearables into their consult, much less integrating that data into their EMR.

The reasons for this are many. For one thing, doctors are creatures of habit, and are unlikely to change their assessment routine unless they are pushed into doing so. What’s more, their EMRs are not set up to gather fitness data in a routine and streamlined data. Then when you consider that physicians aren’t quite sure what to do with the data – short of a shocking data outlier, what does a physician do with a few weeks of exercise data? – it seems even less likely that they’ll leverage wearables data into their clinical routine.

Over the next few years, however, this state of affairs should change dramatically.

Data analytics systems will begin to including wearables data into their calculations about individual and population health. And physicians will be expected to become adept at using wearables to better track the health status of chronically-ill patients. In short, wearables should fundamentally change the way physicians care for patients, especially those at greater risk.

Here’s some examples of how this will play out.

Data analytics

In an effort to improve the health of entire patient populations, organizations such Louisiana-based Ochsner Health System are testing Apple’s HealthKit technology. Through HealthKit, which connects with Ochsner’s Epic Systems EMR, the health system will be able to pull in and integrate a wide range of consumer-generated data, notably input from wearables.

While Ochsner’s first big win came from its test with wireless scales for heart patients—which led to a 40% decrease in admissions—the bigger picture calls for clinicians to use wearables data too, leveraging it to track the health of it entire patient base.

Tracking the chronically ill

Though most wearable health bands are consumer devices, used largely by the already fit to help them stay that way, medical device companies are building a new class of wearable devices designed to help clinicians track serious chronic illnesses in a serious manner.

Phillips, for example, announced a few months ago that it had released a biosensor patch designed to track symptoms of COPD, send the data to a cloud-based central software platform using the patient’s wireless device, then route the results to that patient’s clinician via a pair of related apps. This gives the physician 24-hour access to key indicators of COPD status, including respiratory rate, heart activity and rhythm and physical activity.

Conclusion: Much more to come

The bottom line in all of this is that wireless monitoring of remote patients has already arrived, and that new uses for data from health bands and other fitness devices are likely to become a standard part of patient care over the next few years.

While no one is suggesting that the data and practical observations a doctor gathers during a fact-to-face medical visit are becoming less value, medical practice is likely rely more heavily on monitoring of wearable smart bands, sensors, smart bands, sensor-laden smart clothing and more as time goes by. Now is a good time to prepare for this shift in medical practice, or risk getting left behind.

Anne Zieger of Zieger Healthcare

Anne Zieger is CEO of Zieger Healthcare

Zieger Healthcare’s team of veteran marketing communications pros will help you reach out to key healthcare stakeholders and grab their attention.  With decades of experience in the industry, we know exactly how to tell healthcare stories that sell.


Posted in: A Career in Practice Management, Electronic Medical Records, Innovation

Leave a Comment (0) →

Bringing Physicians and Patients Together Via Smartphone? Dr.Church Has An App For That!

Text to Doctor

I am always excited when physicians design products for other physicians because they “get it.” Here’s the tale of a Midwest physician, Dr. Fred Church, who has developed  a free app  to communicate one-on-one with his patients via email or text.

Mary Pat: Dr. Church, tell me how you came to design e-Consult My Doctor, an app that lets physicians and patients communicate with the ease of email and text in a secure environment.
Dr. Church: I suppose the axiom of “necessity is the mother of all innovation/invention” applies here. I saw a growing need and had a growing entrepreneurial passion to solve the problem for more physician-patient interaction between scheduled visits. I believe we are at the precipice of still greater demand for mobile connectivity and services in America.
The premise of private communications to enhance doctor-patient relationships is not a novelty, but how to do it in a HIPAA-compliant manner that is also is simple and convenient is a significant challenge. We are delivering an elegant smartphone app that uniquely understands a busy doctor’s and patient’s lives and works to serve them. We have created a utility that enables any doctor to be a concierge-service doctor and every patient to be the beneficiary of that great personalized care – care that is direct from the doctors that know them and whom they trust.
Mary Pat: You describe e-Consult My Doctor as a tool to augment the physician-patient relationship, not replace the traditional office visit. Can you give some examples of this?

Dr. Church: In no way is our communication management tool intended to replace the face-to-face interaction and assessment between a physician and his established patient.  We have terms of service that users will explicitly understand and agree to prior to participation. Doctors will not have to worry about this being crystal clear to patients. Most reasonable people understand that emergency situations need to be dealt with in-person and this tool is not intended to deliver emergency communications.   Example Scenarios: 

  1. “Doctor, can you give me an evaluation of this mole as I think it has changed since you last saw me for my physical? You told me to watch it and document it myself on my phone… should I be seeing you now or wait until my next physical?”
  2. “Surgeon, I am three days post-op and it’s Sunday afternoon and I’m scheduled to see you tomorrow for follow-up.  Can you take a look at these two pictures of my wound to tell me if I need to go to the urgent care or ER tonight before tomorrow’s follow-up? I’m not alarmed but a little concerned at how it looks and I want to have your opinion before my scheduled follow-up.”
  3. “Doctor, one month ago I described to you during Betsy’s well-child visit the rare sounds and behavior changes I was hearing and seeing from my 3 month-old daughter and felt like I was having difficulty adequately explaining it to you. Guess what, I was able to capture it on this video with audio.  Can you listen to it and tell me your opinion if I should be concerned about it? Should I bring her back in after you view this so you can examine her again and/or do more lab workup?”
  4. “Doctor, we talked about considering certain omega 3 supplements and I want your opinion on this particular supplement (see picture of label) from XYZ that the pharmacist recommended. Do you think it’s a good one also?  I appreciate your opinion before my next follow up with you.”

Mary Pat: Foremost in everyone’s mind is the privacy and confidentiality of texting and emailing – how does e-Consult My Doctor achieve HIPAA compliance? 

Dr. Church: Our smartphone app technology uses best practice standards for data at rest and in transit using AES 256-bit encryption. Doctors and patients will have a secure login to their app so that if their phone is stolen or misplaced, the data is still encrypted and cannot be viewed without a user’s password. If a user’s account is somehow compromised, administratively we can suspend his account, his e-consulting relationships, and access to the information between those relationships.

Mary Pat: Do you see this product replacing the traditional function of a nurse triage in the medical practice?

Dr. Church: Absolutely not. In fact, it is intended to offload the burden that triage is often overwhelmed with. Traditional healthcare will always need people to properly triage communications at a doctor’s office.  Unfortunately, high volumes and increased costs mean that calls are not always responded to in a timely way. Doctors need communication tools that are portable and flexible and this describes e-Consult My Doctor.

Mary Pat: Your software has some interesting features, including a mini-EMR or PHR (Personal Health Record.) Can you describe the benefits of a mini-EMR available from a smartphone?

Dr. Church: Because our solution is much less complex than an EHR (Electronic Health Record), a single adult patient user may keep and manage all of his dependents’ information on one app securely. Our well-designed smartphone app stores all related health event reminders, vaccine history, and PHR information. The PHR on our smartphone app is viewable/editable without the requirement of an internet connection, which is a clear advantage over EHR portals.  When patients participate in managing their information and updating their PHR data between visits, it makes it easier for intake nurses/staff during scheduled visits to make sure the EHR’s data is also reflecting recent changes that may be more current than EHR updates from various sources: other urgent cares/ERs, other specialty doctors, other health providers/doctors/sub-specialists (DDS, DC, DPM, etc.), hospitals etc. One of the main advantages of patients participating in their own PHR information is it will hopefully improve PHR accuracy, contribute to better patient compliance, and help serve both patients and doctors in traditional healthcare delivery.

Mary Pat: How does the documentation of the communication between the physician and the patient get back into the practice EMR?

Dr. Church: The app will allow for exporting content via PDF and both doctors and patients will have their own copy of e-consultation data on their apps. Doctors may elect to attach the PDF of the e-consultation interaction to their respective EHR if they believe it is important enough and pertinent to a patient’s long-term record. For example, several EHRs do not have the ability to import pictures, audio, and video content which this app will easily store for minimal convenience fees.  Additionally, a doctor can simply summarize the exchange in her next scheduled office visit’s documentation if she feels the content is important enough. This will vary on an individual case-by-case basis and will be up to the doctor’s judgment.

Mary Pat: Between the secure communication and the mini-EMR, e-Consult My Doctor sounds very much like a patient portal. Can your software replace a patient portal for a medical practice?

Dr. Church: The mission of our software is to deliver a different and simpler solution for convenient communication and to augment the functionality of an EHR’s patient portal. An EHR patient portal is valuable for a singular patient to see what his doctor’s EHR documents as his current information including labs, vitals, etc.  The e-Consult My Doctor app will allow direct one-to-one communication any time and anywhere the doctor and patient are willing to participate.  One of the foundational premises of our product is that a doctor’s extra time and effort should be rewarded directly by the beneficiary… like having pay-as-you-go access to their mobile phone or email for enhanced, personalized care between scheduled visits.

Mary Pat: You have essentially designed a product that allows physicians to be reimbursed for care that they have been previously providing for free. Some patients will appreciate the convenience and be willing to pay for the personal attention and others will think it is akin to the airlines charging for luggage! How do you answer those who think healthcare is already too expensive without any additional fees? 

Dr. Church: I’m amazed how many people are willing to pay for the $1,000 – $2000 per patient per year for 24/7/365 access that they may only utilize a few times a year. I personally know concierge doctors who are eagerly looking forward to our HIPAA-compliant solution that will help them achieve better work-family life balance with our communication management tool.  We believe our smartphone app will bring a revolutionary solution that allows every doctor and every patient to participate in a concierge e-consulting relationship at a potentially lower price point. Our solution eliminates the middleman with a convenient and simple solution at a very affordable price and payment is directly and immediately received by the doctor.

Mary Pat: When will this product be available on the market and what will it cost physicians to purchase?

Dr. Church: The anticipated market delivery date is November 30, 2013. The app will be free and the basic subscription level will also be free. Users will be given a limited amount of secure storage space and may upgrade to larger amounts based on their individual needs. We will also offer a premium subscription level that will afford a larger secure space allotment and additional valuable service offerings. Our app will offer a pay-as-you-go, transactional model for the basic subscription level and a fixed-price price point for the value-minded user who wants more. Fred Church

Mary Pat: How can readers get in line to try your app?

Dr. Church: They can go to and sign up for pre-launch information and be the first to try it out.  We invite physicians who want to be beta-testers!

Posted in: Amazing Customer Service, Electronic Medical Records, Innovation, Learn This: Technology Answers, Practice Marketing, Social Media

Leave a Comment (0) →

How Are Physicians Returning to Private Practice?

Cresting Wave

The healthcare industry has gone through a lot of change very quickly in the past five years, with still more to come. Independent practices and smaller physician groups have a lot of reason to “seek higher ground” in mergers, partnerships, and buyouts by larger groups and hospitals that have the resources to better deal with lower reimbursement and increasing regulation. Still, just as we are seeing the crest of the wave of physicians selling their practices to hospitals, we are also beginning to see a lot of the reverse trend – physicians leaving hospital employment and starting their own practices.

We have a number of new solo physician practices among our clients and each of these practices can make the numbers work for the three reasons outlined below. Their new practices may look much different from the practices they once had, but they now can bypass the crushing financial burden of start-up costs and find ways to cut expensive overhead. As hospitals ratchet down physician salaries and present new hoops from them to jump through, more and more physicians will look to these new tools for independence and financial viability.

Free EMR

In 2008 I was living in Seattle and I attended a conference at Microsoft in Redmond, Washington. It was there that I met Dr. Bill Crounse, the Senior Director of Worldwide Health for Microsoft. He was kind enough to sit down for a few minutes and talk to me about the future of physician practices. He told me something at the time that I didn’t really understand. He said, “Something is about to happen that will be  game changer for physicians.” At the time I didn’t understand what he meant, but today I believe he was hinting of the pending launch of Practice Fusion, the first free electronic medical record (EMR.)

The free EMR has indeed been a game changer for physicians. The ability to e-prescribe and report PQRS to avoid Medicare financial penalties and to collect the EHR Stimulus money (aka Meaningful Use) without the typical $25 -$30K outlay per physician has been a boon for many practices. How can an EMR be free? With advertising and the agreement that they blind and sell your data to third parties. (Have EMR companies been doing this all along and not telling you? A topic for another post.)

Physicians still need a billing system to run their businesses, but today software vendors are bundling billing packages with practice management and/or EMR software. For anywhere from 2.9% – 5% of net revenue, physicians can use the software and receive insurance billing services as a package. The two largest vendors providing this service are Athena and eClinical Works.

Social Media

The second reason physicians can start a private practice is the replacement of traditional (quite expensive) traditional marketing with social media. For a fraction of the cost of a direct mail campaign, a physician can use social media to establish a digital presence via a website, blog, YouTube and Facebook. These mediums are not free, but they are long tail, meaning that they will continue to drive patients to the practice long after a direct mail postcard has been thrown in the trash.

New Practice Models

Physicians and other care providers have a choice of self-employed practice models today.  Here are a few choices they have:

    • Concierge – concierge can mean different things to different people, but I am using it to describe a practice that accepts insurance and also requires an additional fee from all patients on top of insurance payments.
    • Medicare Subscription – similar to concierge, but applies the additional fee for Medicare patients only to pay for additional services not covered by Medicare, particularly an annual physical examination.
    • Direct Pay – this is a primary care model where patients pay a monthly fee each month that covers unlimited primary care (sick and well visits) and some in-house laboratory services. This model also includes direct-contracting with employers.
    • Telemedicine – gaining popularity for more than just rural specialty care, telemedicine is seeing patients via a secure video connection.
    • House Calls – this model is coming back as a pure practice model because physicians and other care providers do not have to invest in a brick and mortar office. Coupled with the ability to accept payments via their smartphones and the influx of baby boomers, this model is gaining popularity quickly.
    • Nursing Home – Another “rounding” type of practice like the House Call practice, physicians spend 100% of their time in nursing homes seeing patients.
    • On Call Specialty Practice – specialty physicians, typically surgeons, see patients pre and post-surgery in the office of the referring physician and have no brick and mortar office.
    • Cash Practice – this is a 100% cash model with no insurance payments accepted. Typically, physicians will provide patients with what they need to be reimbursed from their insurance plan. Because insurance is not filed, the practice can afford to discount their prices.
    • Co-op Practice – this is a time-share-type practice where one practice or a non-physician owner leases space to physicians, providing everything for one fee except billing, EMR and a medical assistant.
    • Micropractice – an even skinnier form of the co-op practice, the physician works without any assistants and does everything him/herself with just a computer, utilizing one exam room. Micropractice physicians see on average 8 to 10 patients a day.

For more information on different practice models, see our posts Yes, You Can and Should Start a Solo Medical Practice in 2013!How Physicians Can Offer Direct Primary Care to Employers: An Interview with Dr. Samir Qamar of MedLion,  The Direct Pay Physician Practice Model: An Interview With Scott Borden and Physicians are Leaving Hospital Employment and Starting New Practices on Their Own Terms.

If you would like to receive Manage My Practice articles via email, click here to subscribe.


(Photo Credit: nathangibbs via Compfightcc)


Posted in: General

Leave a Comment (11) →

Informedika’s Steve Yaskin Designs a Solution for His Wife, the Doctor

Busy MailroomI get pitched new products and services every day and it is pretty rare that I hear of something that is startlingly new. Informedika is just that – it addresses an old, old problem for practices in a new way. Continue reading for a very interesting interview with Informedika Founder and CEO Steve Yaskin.

Mary Pat: Tell us how Informedika came to be.

Steve: I am the founder and CEO of several high-tech companies in Silicon Valley and I’ve spent many years passionately solving problems using technology.  In 2011 my attention turned to a problem that my wife, Dr. Inna Yaskin, faced in her medical practice every single day – the astoundingly inefficient process of ordering diagnostic tests and dealing with the results.


Posted in: Day-to-Day Operations, Finance, Innovation

Leave a Comment (0) →

Natural Language Processing, First Steps Towards Telehealth, and a Single App to Read any EHR in another edition of Manage My Practice’s 2.0 Tuesday!

As managers, providers and employees, we always have to be looking ahead at how the technology on our horizon will affect how our organizations administer health care. In the spirit of looking forward to the future, we present “2.0 Tuesday”, a  feature on Manage My Practice about how technology is impacting our practices, and our patient and population outcomes.

We hope you enjoy looking ahead with us, and share your ideas, reactions and comments below!

  • Natural Language Processing Advances Allow for Improved Insight into Public Health

Writing for KevinMD, Jaan Sidorov, author of the Disease Management Care Blog highlights several examples of how Natural Language Processing- the idea of teaching computer programs to understand the relationship between words in human speech (teaching them to not just hear us, but understand us- like Watson understood the clues on Jeopardy) is being be applied to the Electronic Health Record to predict and prepare for public health trends, as well as to correct mistakes present in the electronic record due to human error. Recent developments like the CDC’s Biosense program allow public health officials at local, state and federal levels to monitor big picture trends in public health by the words and diagnoses reported in medical documentation- keeping an ear on health trends, by “listening” to data about reported health incidents.

  • 10 Best Practices for Implementing Telemedicine in Hospitals

Sabrina Rodak at Becker Orthopedic, Spine and Pain Management has put together a fantastic list of the steps and assessments involved in implementing a telemedicine program in a hospital setting. Although written with Orthopods in mind, the questions that need to be answered, and the steps that need to be taken to develop a strong, lasting program are similar across many different programs and specialties. With so much excitement in the field, it is very nice to see someone talk about the process of taking these technologies from drawing board excitement to nuts-and-bolts execution.

(via FierceHealthIT)

  • San Diego Health System Seeks to Develop Single App to Access Any EMR

Presenting at a Toronto Mobile Healthcare Summit Last Week, Dr. Benjamin Kanter, CIO of Palomar Pomerado Health presented the two-hospital system’s plans to develop their own native mobile application to view as many different Electronic Medical Records as possible from a single mobile interface. In other words, this fairly small health system, who has only devoted three employees to the project, is taking on one of the biggest, and toughest challenges in HIT by simply saying “We can do it ourselves!”, and from some of the reactions from the conference attendees who saw the presentation, they are off to quite a strong start. The first version of the program should launch for Android in March, and the system already has a deal in place with vendor Cerner to access their systems. Stay tuned!

(via ITWorldCanada)


Be sure to check back soon for another 2.0 Tuesday!





Posted in: 2.0 Tuesday, Electronic Medical Records

Leave a Comment (0) →

Guest Consultant Joe Hage Talks With Expert Michael Pacquin on Choosing the Right EMR

This is a guest post from Joe Hage, CEO of medical device marketing consultancy Medical Marcom.

HIMMS fellow Michael Paquin advises how to set up an appropriate EMR selection meeting in this short video.


Posted in: Electronic Medical Records

Leave a Comment (0) →

Managed IT Services, HIPAA/HITECH Compliance and Changing IT Providers: Ed Garay from Lutrum Answers Your IT Questions.

Mary Pat: Where does the name of your company, Lutrum, come from?

Ed Garay: When I was developing a name for this company, I didn’t want to be like every other healthcare IT services company with health, md, medical, etc. as part of their name.  I wanted it to represent something deeper about what we do and who we are as an IT organization.  Although we are IT specialists, I realized that one of the things that I am always working with my team on is to listen and understand our client’s needs.  Which lead me to creating the name, Lutrum.  Lutrum is a slight variant of the Latin word Lutra.  Lutra means otter in English.  And the otter symbolizes empathy.

Mary Pat: What led up to you starting your own business?

Ed Garay: In late 2000, I worked as an IT Director for an organization that continued to downsize.  I came to a career crossroad.  With starting to support under 100 systems, and the network running in tip-top shape, there was really no need for me to be there full-time in the long run.  So, do I look for another job that can’t possibly be as fulfilling as where I was, or do I take a leap of faith and start up my own business and share my knowledge with the masses?  Through the feedback of mentors and other resources that knew me personally and professionally, I was highly motivated to take the leap of faith and have never looked back.  My business career has evolved over the years and has naturally lead me to Lutrum.

Mary Pat: What are Managed IT Services?


Posted in: Compliance, Electronic Medical Records, General

Leave a Comment (0) →

mHealth Gives Home Health a Whole New Meaning

a picture of a mobile phone with a red cross on its screen

One of the most exciting trends in modern healthcare can be found at the intersection of two larger societal changes: the shifting demographics of an aging Baby-Boomer population, and the fast adoption of smart mobile devices and mobile application platforms. As robust, secure and intuitive mHealth applications are adopted, patients are more empowered to monitor and share their health data outside of a traditional medical office or hospital setting. As healthcare delivery system already short on providers becomes even more taxed, mHealth applications will allow the system as a whole (patients, caregivers, loved ones, and payers) to navigate health decisions in a more efficient and informed way.

This quote from the Deloitte Center for Health Solutions 2010 Survey of Health Care Consumers says it all:

“Boomers view tech-enabled health products as a way to foster control and ongoing independence for themselves, especially in light of the rise in incidence in chronic disease with aging, and their desire to reduce costs. Nearly 56% of boomers show a high willingness to use in-home health monitoring devices in tandem with care of their primary physician.”

What are the advantages of pushing home health medical data from the source to the care provider?

  • Minimum lag time between data collection and the clinician’s ability to review it.
  • Reduction in errors associated with human intervention in data entry.
  • Intuitive and simple interfaces promote active patient involvement and caregiver communication in healthcare management.
  • Secure sharing of PHI (Protected Health Information) with patient, family members, and approved internal and external stakeholders in health.

Here are just a few of the companies and products available now (or in the near future) that might change your mind about where and how health data is captured and shared. Each of these products automates the capture of health data and the transfer of the data in a usable format to an Electronic Health Record.

Near Field Communications

NFC (Near Field Communications) is a wireless technology that allows for quick transfer of data between two sensors that are fairly close (an inch or two) together. The secure transfer allows for seamless data tracking inside caregivers’ workflow. For example: medical supplies, drugs, injectables and fluids can be fitted with low cost sensors that are swiped past a patient’s sensor to indicate they will be administered to the patient, and then again past the provider’s sensor to indicate a finished procedure, capturing time of administration, dosage, and patient information without slowing down the care to enter this critical data by writing them down, typing them in, or just resolving to remember them for later entry.

Gentag makes the data sensors and applications that manufacturers can use to send data via cell phone to the hospital or physician for seamless inclusion in the electronic medical record (EMR). Monitoring of blood pressure, fever, weight management and urinalysis are just a few of the ways Gentag has improved data capture in healthcare.

iMPak Health makes a cholesterol monitor the size of a credit card that accepts a small blood sample to process for triglyceride levels. The data is uploaded wirelessly to a cell phone that transmits it to a health provider.

Smart Fabrics and Wearable Monitors

Researchers at the Universidad Carlos III de Madrid in Spain developed a fascinating concept for an “Intelligent T-Shirt” that uses sensors woven into a washable fabric to create a hospital garment that does more than preserve the patient’s modesty. The sensors in the fabric can detect and record temperature, bioelectric impulses (for ECG monitoring), as well as the patients location, current resting position, and level of physical activity.

Copenhagen Institute of Interaction Design graduate Pedro Nakazato Andrade has designed a dynamic cast called Bones that collects muscle activity data around a fracture area by using electromyographic (EMG) sensors to report the patient’s progress to physicians automatically. This could reduce the need for follow-up visits and imaging, or change the specifics of rehabilitation.

The Basis Band is a wristwatch-type accessory that monitors heart rate by directing light into the skin to image blood flow. It also uses a heat sensor for skin temperature changes, an accelerometer for recording movement and activity, and sensors for galvanic skin response. The band also gives customers access to a free, web-based health dashboard to oversee the data the device collects and transmits.

There are still some considerable hurdles to full adoption of mobile home health monitoring. Very few patients use only one medical device, so not only do monitoring devices need to work with networked EHR technologies, they have to be integrated with each other to present a comprehensive picture of health to providers and Health Information Exchanges (HIEs). Also, as patients navigate the system of generalists, specialists, and emergency care providers, the possibility of encountering multiple software and hardware platforms will require flexible, integrated solutions that can run on any device. As with any networked application of sensitive data, security and availability are major factors in a success deployment. Unless patients can count on the privacy of their data, and providers can count on the uptime of their software, healthcare systems won’t be able to realize the full benefit of mHealth installations. On top of that, more monitoring of patient health means that there will be even more data to be collected on each patient, and on the population as a whole. While more data means more opportunity for large scale research and analysis for the public benefit, it also means more data has to be secured and protected as a part of the health record, requiring even more security and storage resources. And finally, the Food and Drug Administration will have a large say in the future of mHealth application development through industry regulation. Device makers and application developers will certainly have to work within a governmental framework which will have a large say in the time-to-market of many possible products.

With all that being said, the opportunity to meet the demographic challenges of an already stressed healthcare system with mobile home health monitoring and Electronic Health Records will be one of the major themes of the future of both the heath and technology industries.

Posted in: Innovation

Leave a Comment (0) →

Guest Consultant Joe Hage Talks With Expert Michael Pacquin on EMR Implementation and Training

This is a guest post from Joe Hage, CEO of medical device marketing consultancy Medical Marcom.

My friend Michael Paquin is a fellow of HIMSS, the Health Information Management Systems Society, and an expert in EMR connectivity, Meaningful Use, and the pitfalls of both. Michael shares his thoughts on both in this short video, which is also in transcript form below.

Michael Paquin: I think if we are looking at physicians today and trying to address some of the problems they’re having in their offices and what they’re afraid of in purchasing an Electronic Medical Record, I think we have to start from the beginning and that is service and implementation.

I want to empower all physicians to make vendors give them the service they need. Getting an EMR is just one part of the puzzle in being successful in achieving your Meaningful Use dollar.

The Meaning Use dollars over a five-year period can add up to about $48,000 to $64,000 depending if you’re applying for Medicare or Medicaid. What you really need to think about is that purchase price and negotiate it well, don’t overspend but do overspend if you will, I know that’s contradictory, but do overspend when it comes to implementation and training.

A lot of doctors purchase an Electronic Medical Record and think they can have the training done in 3 days. I’d like you to think about that for just a moment.

If each and every one of you just bought Microsoft Office and brought it into your practice for the first year or first training, could you get trained on PowerPoint, Outlook, Word, Excel all the different features of Microsoft Office in three days while you’re not seeing patients or you are seeing patients? Can you train all 3-4 nurses in your office? What does that mean?

So what I’m suggesting to you is take the time to get trained so that you can use the product correctly. What I’m seeing out in the marketplace is doctors starting to go with their second or third vendor for their Electronic Medical Record software because they have an unsuccessful first brush with Vendor A or Vendor B – they weren’t trained.

All these systems have workflow issues, all of them are trying to address them, and all of them are trying to get better. None of them are going to be perfect but what’s going to make a perfect EMR installation for you is the training.

  • Make sure you negotiate all the prices.
  • Make sure you buy from a vendor that is certified by the ONC.
  • Make sure you’ve got that certification.

Certification means when you get your Meaningful Use dollars you can show your product was certified. So there is a lot to getting ready for purchasing an EMR, there is a lot to choosing the right vendor.

Make sure that you get in touch with an EMR consultant, there are a lot of lessons learned that will pay for a consultant’s time. Anyway in this first video I think we’ve covered enough but feel free to contact me with any questions.

Joe Hage: So I’ll paraphrase. When you’re choosing an EMR partner make sure that it is going to be around and one that can provide you with the level of training you need.

Michael Paquin: And certified.

Joe Hage: And certified, Michael thank you very much.

Posted in: Electronic Medical Records

Leave a Comment (5) →
Page 1 of 2 12