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Flu Shot Information: 2016 – 2017

This season's flu shot recommendations bring several changes.

 

 

CDC Updates Flu Shot Recommendations for 2016-2017 Flu Season

A few things are new this season:

  • Only injectable flu shots are recommended for use this season.
  • Flu vaccines have been updated to better match circulating viruses.
  • There will be some new vaccines on the market this season.
  • Live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) – or the nasal spray vaccine – is not recommended for use during the 2016-2017 season because of concerns about its effectiveness.
  • CPT code 90674 is a new code for 2017, and some code descriptions are revised for 2017 to indicate dosage as opposed to age.
  • The recommendations for vaccination of people with egg allergies have changed.

The recommendations for people with egg allergies have been updated for this season:

  • People who have experienced only hives after exposure to egg can get any licensed flu vaccine that is otherwise appropriate for their age and health.
  • People who have symptoms other than hives after exposure to eggs, such as angioedema, respiratory distress, lightheadedness, or recurrent emesis; or who have needed epinephrine or another emergency medical intervention, also can get any licensed flu vaccine that is otherwise appropriate for their age and health, but the vaccine should be given in a medical setting and be supervised by a health care provider who is able to recognize and manage severe allergic conditions. (Settings include hospitals, clinics, health departments, and physician offices). People with egg allergies no longer have to wait 30 minutes after receiving their vaccine.

Options this season include:

  • Standard dose flu shots. Most are given into the muscle (usually with a needle, but one can be given to some people with a jet injector). One is given into the skin.
  • A high-dose shot for older people.
  • A shot made with adjuvant for older people.
  • A shot made with virus grown in cell culture.
  • A shot made using a vaccine production technology (recombinant vaccine) that does not require the use of flu virus.

 

Medicare and the Flu Shot

The Medicare Part B payment allowance limits for seasonal influenza and pneumococcal vaccines are 95% of the Average Wholesale Price (AWP) as reflected in the published compendia except where the vaccine is furnished in a hospital outpatient department. When the vaccine is furnished in the hospital outpatient department, payment for the vaccine is based on reasonable cost.

Providers should note that:

  • All physicians, non-physician practitioners and suppliers who administer the influenza virus vaccination and the pneumococcal vaccination must take assignment on the claim for the vaccine.
  • The annual Part B deductible and coinsurance amounts do not apply.

 

Medicare Payment Allowances and Effective Dates for the 2016-2017 Flu Season

Effective Dates 8/1/2016 – 7/31/2017

  • CPT 90630 Payment allowance is $20.343.
  • CPT 90653 Payment allowance is $37.383.
  • CPT 90656 Payment allowance is $17.717.
  • CPT 90657 Payment allowance is pending.
  • CPT 90661 Payment allowance is pending.
  • CPT 90662 Payment allowance is $42.722.
  • CPT 90672 Payment allowance is $26.876.
  • CPT 90673 Payment allowance is $40.613.
  • CPT 90674 Payment allowance is $22.936.
  • CPT 90685 Payment allowance is $26.268.
  • CPT 90686 Payment allowance is $19.032.
  • CPT 90687 Payment allowance is $9.403.
  • CPT 90688 Payment allowance is $17.835.
  • HCPCS Q2035 Payment allowance is $16.284.
  • HCPCS Q2037 Payment allowance is $16.284.
  • HCPCS Q2039 Flu Vaccine Adult – Not Otherwise Classified payment allowance is to be determined by the local claims processing contractor with effective dates of 8/1/2016-7/31/2017.

Click here for a handy flu shot chart with CPT codes and manufacturers.

 

Posted in: Collections, Billing & Coding, Medical Coding Education, Medicare & Reimbursement, Medicare This Week

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CMS and AMA Make ICD-10 “Family” Clarification

Medicare will reimburse claims with ICD-10 codes as long as they are in the correct code "family" for 12 months.

Clarifying Questions and Answers Related to the July 6, 2015 CMS/AMA Joint Announcement and Guidance Regarding ICD-10 Flexibilities

Question 1:

When will the ICD-10 Ombudsman be in place?

Answer 1:

The Ombudsman will be in place by October 1, 2015.

Question 2:

Does the Guidance mean there is a delay in ICD-10 implementation?

Answer 2:

No. The CMS/AMA Guidance does not mean there is a delay in the implementation of the ICD-10 code set requirement for Medicare or any other organization. Medicare claims with a date of service on or after October 1, 2015, will be rejected if they do not contain a valid ICD-10 code. The Medicare claims processing systems do not have the capability to accept ICD-9 codes for dates of service after September 30, 2015 or accept claims that contain both ICD-9 and ICD-10 codes for any dates of service. Submitters should follow existing procedures for correcting and resubmitting rejected claims.

Question 3:

What is a valid ICD-10 code?

Answer 3:

ICD-10-CM is composed of codes with 3, 4, 5, 6 or 7 characters. Codes with three characters are included in ICD-10-CM as the heading of a category of codes that may be further subdivided by the use of fourth, fifth, sixth or seventh characters to provide greater specificity. A three-character code is to be used only if it is not further subdivided. To be valid, a code must be coded to the full number of characters required for that code, including the 7th character, if applicable. Many people use the term billable codes to mean valid codes. For example, E10 (Type 1 diabetes mellitus), is a category title that includes a number of specific ICD-10-CM codes for type 1 diabetes. Examples of valid codes within category E10 include E10.21 (Type 1 diabetes mellitus with diabetic nephropathy) which contains five characters and code E10.9 (Type 1 diabetes mellitus without complications) which contains four characters.

A complete list of the 2016 ICD-10-CM valid codes and code titles is posted on the CMS website at http://www.cms.gov/Medicare/Coding/ICD10/2016-ICD-10-CM-and-GEMs.html. The codes are listed in tabular order (the order found in the ICD-10-CM code book). This list should assist providers who are unsure as to whether additional characters are needed, such as the addition of a 7th character in order to arrive at a valid code.

Question 4: What should I do if my claim is rejected? Will I know whether it was rejected because it is not a valid code versus denied due to a lack of specificity required for a NCD or LCD or other claim edit?

Answer 4:

Yes, submitters will know that it was rejected because it was not a valid code versus a denial for lack of specificity required for a NCD or LCD or other claim edit. Submitters should follow existing procedures for correcting and resubmitting rejected claims and issues related to denied claims.

Question 5:

What is meant by a family of codes?

Answer 5:

“Family of codes” is the same as the ICD-10 three-character category. Codes within a category are clinically related and provide differences in capturing specific information on the type of condition. For instance, category H25 (Age-related cataract) contains a number of specific codes that capture information on the type of cataract as well as information on the eye involved. Examples include: H25.031 (Anterior subcapsular polar age-related cataract, right eye), which has six characters; H25.22 (Age-related cataract, morgagnian type, left eye), which has five characters; and H25.9 (Unspecified age-related cataract), which has four characters. One must report a valid code and not a category number. In many instances, the code will require more than 3 characters in order to be valid.

Question 6:

Does the recent Guidance mean that no claims will be denied if they are submitted with an ICD-10 code that is not at the maximum level of specificity?

Answer 6:

In certain circumstances, a claim may be denied because the ICD-10 code is not consistent with an applicable policy, such as Local Coverage Determinations or National Coverage Determinations. (See Question 7 for more information about this). This reflects the fact that current automated claims processing edits are not being modified as a result of the guidance.

In addition, the ICD-10 code on a claim must be a valid ICD-10 code. If the submitted code is not recognized as a valid code, the claim will be rejected. The physician can resubmit the claims with a valid code.

Question 7:

National Coverage Determinations (NCD) and Local Coverage Determinations (LCD) often indicate specific diagnosis codes are required. Does the recent Guidance mean the published NCDs and LCDs will be changed to include families of codes rather than specific codes?

Answer 7:

No. As stated in the CMS’ Guidance, for 12 months after ICD-10 implementation, Medicare review contractors will not deny physician or other practitioner claims billed under the Part B physician fee schedule through either automated medical review or complex medical record review based solely on the specificity of the ICD-10 diagnosis code as long as the physician/practitioner used a valid code from the right family of codes. The Medicare review contractors include the Medicare Administrative Contractors, the Recovery Auditors, the Zone Program Integrity Contractors, and the Supplemental Medical Review Contractor.

As such, the recent Guidance does not change the coding specificity required by the NCDs and LCDs. Coverage policies that currently require a specific diagnosis under ICD-9 will continue to require a specific diagnosis under ICD-10. It is important to note that these policies will require no greater specificity in ICD-10 than was required in ICD-9, with the exception of laterality, which does not exist in ICD-9. LCDs and NCDs that contain ICD-10 codes for right side, left side, or bilateral do not allow for unspecified side. The NCDs and LCDs are publicly available and can be found at http://www.cms.gov/medicare-coverage-database/.

Question 8:

Are technical component (TC) only and global claims included in this same CMS/AMA guidance because they are paid under the Part B physician fee schedule?

Answer 8:

Yes, all services paid under the Medicare Fee-for-Service Part B physician fee schedule are covered by the guidance.

Question 9:

Do the ICD-10 audit and quality program flexibilities extend to Medicare fee-for-service prior authorization requests?

Answer 9:

No, the audit and quality program flexibilities only pertain to post payment reviews. ICD-10 codes with the correct level of specificity will be required for prepayment reviews and prior authorization requests.

MEDICAID

Question 10:

If a Medicare paid claim is crossed over to Medicaid for a dual-eligible beneficiary, is Medicaid required to pay the claim?

Answer 10:

State Medicaid programs are required to process submitted claims that include ICD-10 codes for services furnished on or after October 1 in a timely manner. Claims processing verifies that the individual is eligible, the claimed service is covered, and that all administrative requirements for a Medicaid claim have been met. If these tests are met, payment can be made, taking into account the amount paid or payable by Medicare. Consistent with those processes, Medicaid can deny claims based on system edits that indicate that a diagnosis code is not valid.

Question 11:

Does this added ICD-10 flexibility regarding audits only apply to Medicare?

Answer 11:

The official Guidance only applies to Medicare fee-for-service claims from physician or other practitioner claims billed under the Medicare Fee-for-Service Part B physician fee schedule. This Guidance does not apply to claims submitted for beneficiaries with Medicaid coverage, either primary or secondary.

Question 12:

Will CMS permit state Medicaid agencies to issue interim payments to providers unable to submit a claim using valid, billable ICD-10 codes?

Answer 12:

Federal matching funding will not be available for provider payments that are not processed through a compliant MMIS and supported by valid, billable ICD-10 codes.

OTHER PAYERS

Question 13:

Will the commercial payers observe the one-year period of claims payment review leniency for ICD-10 codes that are from the appropriate family of codes?

Answer 13:

The official Guidance only applies to Medicare fee-for-service claims from physician or other practitioner claims billed under the Medicare Fee-for-Service Part B physician fee schedule. Each commercial payer will have to determine whether it will offer similar audit flexibilities.

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Posted in: Headlines, ICD-10, Medical Coding Education, Medicare & Reimbursement, Medicare This Week

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Medicare to Providers “Tell Us More”

What's In Your Brain?

 

 

Medicare recently started denying an increased number of claims because documentation submitted for diagnostic tests does not include signed test orders or evidence of intent (MD progress notes listing tests needed) and evidence of medical necessity (description of clinical conditions and treatment showing the need for the testing.)

Most of us who have gone through the implementation of a EMR realize that electronic medical records (EMRs) do not always “tell the story” of a visit in the way that paper records used to. Encounters are documented without the glue that allows an auditor to understand what went on during the visit. Here are three ways to make sure that your documentation meets requirement for Medicare and other payers.

 

Establish Medical Necessity: Make sure the test is attached to the right diagnosis

Some providers attach all diagnoses assigned to a visit to any/every test ordered and performed. This is incorrect. All diagnoses can be attached to the Evaluation & Management (E/M) code, since all were addressed during the visit. Don’t list any diagnoses from previous visits that were not addressed at the current visit unless you note their impact on your decisions for care at the current visit.

Remember that screening tests and diagnostic tests are two different things. A screening test is ordered when you are looking for something with no provocation. Wikipedia states that a screening test “may be performed to monitor disease prevalence, manage epidemiology, aid in prevention, or strictly for statistical purposes.”

A diagnostic test is ordered when there is a sign or symptom that prompts the provider to look for the cause. Wikipedia defines a diagnostic test as “a procedure performed to confirm, or determine the presence of disease in an individual suspected of having the disease, usually following the report of symptoms, or based on the results of other medical tests.”

According to Medscape, the 5 main reasons for any test are as follows:

      • Screening: Screen for disease in asymptomatic patients. For example, a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test in men older than 50 years.
      • Screening: A test may be performed to confirm that a person is free from a disease or condition. For example, a pregnancy test to exclude the diagnosis of ectopic pregnancy.
      • Diagnostic: Establish a diagnosis in symptomatic patients. For example, an ECG to diagnose ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) in patients with chest pain.
      • Diagnostic: Provide prognostic information in patients with established disease. For example, a CD4 count in patients with HIV.
      • Diagnostic: Monitor therapy by either benefits or side effects. For example, measuring the international normalized ratio (INR) in patients taking warfarin.

 

Reveal your decision making in the record

      • Need add’l tests to est. xxxxxx. Plan to…
      • Return in 3 wks and repeat test to establish…
      • DM worsening – will….
      • Consider d/c xxxxxx medication if fatigue persists.
      • Hypothyroidism vs. anemia?
      • Fatigue most likely sec. to HTN meds – r/o electrolyte abn.
      • DM stable, continue current regimen, recheck in 3 months.

 

Don’t forget the signatures!

A signature log can be as simple as entries on a document such as:

Provider Name (printed): ______________________

Full signature (written by provider): ______________

Initials (written by provider): ___________________

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Posted in: Collections, Billing & Coding, Compliance, General, Medical Coding Education, Medicare & Reimbursement, Medicare This Week

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Do You Understand the New Medicare Transitional Care Management Service Codes?

Effective January 1, 2013, Medicare and other payers will pay for two new CPT codes (99495 and 99496) that are used to report physician or qualifying non-physician practitioner transitional care management (TCM) service for patients, following a discharge from a:

  • Hospital
  • Skilled Nursing Facility (SNF)
  • Community Mental Health Center (CMHC)
  • Outpatient observation
  • Partial hospitalization

Using Transitional Health Codes in Your Practice

and including a transition to:

  • Home
  • Domiciliary
  • Rest Home
  • Assisted Living

These two codes require the medical decision-making to be of moderate to high complexity. Each code encompasses one face-to-face visit and non face-to-face services, for instance, arranging home health agencies for patient care.

Codes are selected based on medical decision-making associated with the patient’s condition, the time when the communication is initiated with the patient, and the time when the face-to-face encounter occurs following discharge. The first face-to-face encounter is included. The codes may be reported only once per 30 calendar days. See the full code description at the end of this article.

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Posted in: Collections, Billing & Coding, Day-to-Day Operations, Medical Coding Education, Medicare & Reimbursement, Medicare This Week

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Do You Want to Understand the Revenue Cycle of a Medical Practice? Start Here.

Understanding the Healthcare Revenue CycleNOTE: this series will be repeated in the near future – click on the Webinars tab above for the latest information.

“We’ll start with the money.”

We say that a lot in client meetings at Manage My Practice. Whatever issues might exist in the practices that contact us looking for advice – financial problems will typically need to be addressed first before anything else can be corrected. No matter the size, specialty or type of practice – private, non-profit, and everything in between – the financial foundation of the organization must be built (or remodeled) before choosing strategic partners, determining new service lines, or recruiting physicians.

With no money, there is no mission – or at least no reason for hanging the shingle.

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Posted in: A Career in Practice Management, Collections, Billing & Coding, Day-to-Day Operations, Leadership, Medical Coding Education, Medicare & Reimbursement

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The Complete Guide to Revenue Cycle Management – A New Comprehensive Course from Manage My Practice

You spoke and we listened – you asked for a comprehensive course on Revenue Cycle Management and we brought it to you!

This series is for anyone who wants to understand the medical practice revenue cycle from the very beginning to the very end: physicians, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, advanced practice registered nurses, practice administrators, office managers, consultants, vendors, students, coders, billers and those who want a RCM foundation to enter the healthcare field. Anyone who wants to know more about how reimbursement in healthcare works in the medical practice will find this comprehensive series indispensable.

You won’t find this comprehensive course anywhere else except at Manage My Practice. Webinar leader Mary Pat Whaley, FACMPE, CPC has developed this program from 25+ years of experience in medical practice management and from requests she gets weekly for education on the revenue cycle management process.

Improve Your Medical Practice's Revenue Cycle

The Complete Guide to Revenue Cycle Management – a Five Module Comprehensive Curriculum

Module I. The Foundation

  • Payer Contracting
  • Credentialing
  • Payer Matrix
  • Setting a Fee Schedule
  • Understanding Medicare Part B

Module II. The Data Build

  • Practice Management System Set-up
  • Allowables
  • Patient Demographics & Insurance Information
  • Eligibility & Benefits
  • CPTs, HCPCS, ICD-9

Module III. The Pre-Claim Process

  • Collecting at TOS
  • Documentation: Paper vs Electronic Medical Records (EMR)
  • Physician Coding vs. Abstraction Coding
  • The Superbill vs. Using the EMR to Bill
  • Claim Scrubbing: The Three Gates

Module IV. The Post-Claim Process

  • Write-offs, Denials and Appeals
  • Daily Reconciliation Process
  • Patient Collections and Payment Plans
  • Refunds
  • Recoupments

Module V. Monitoring

  • Monthly Reports
  • The Practice Dashboard/Snapshot Report
  • Strategies for Improving Revenue
  • Benchmarks for Staffing
  • Revenue Cycle Compliance and Auditing

Also Included! Action Pack – Handouts in Word/Excel

  1. Contract Reference Matrix
  2. Contract Review Template
  3. Fee Schedule Worksheet
  4. Medicare Resources
  5. Allowable Cheat Sheet
  6. Write-off Approval Form
  7. Daily Reconciliation Form
  8. Refund Request
  9. Monthly Report List
  10. Sample Snapshot Report
  11. Sample Revenue Cycle Compliance Plan

 

Here’s what one attendee wrote about a recent Manage My Practice Webinar “Information was right on! Great examples and real life experiences.”

 

5-Week Course for $799.00 (Two Options)

Option One : Every Tuesday for Five Weeks – March 12, 19, 26, April 2, and April 9

Click Here To Register!

Module I: Tuesday, March 12 @7pm ET for 90 minutes

Module II: Tuesday, March 19 @7pm ET for 90 minutes

Module III: Tuesday, March 26 @7pm ET for 90 minutes

Module IV: Tuesday, April 2 @7pm ET for 90 minutes

Module V: Tuesday, April 9 @7pm ET for 90 minutes

——————–

Option Two: Every Thursday for Five Weeks – March 14, 21, 28, April 4 and April 11

Click Here To Register!

Module I: Thursday, March 14 @1pm ET for 90 minutes

Module II: Thursday, March 21 @1pm ET for 90 minutes

Module III: Thursday, March 28 @1pm ET for 90 minutes

Module IV: Thursday, April 4 @1pm ET for 90 minutes

Module V: Thursday, April 11 @1pm ET for 90 minutes

——————–

Mary Pat Whaley

Mary Pat Whaley, FACMPE, CPC has 25+ years managing physician practices of all sizes and specialties in the private and public sectors. She is Certified Professional Coder, is Board Certified in Medical Practice Management and is a Fellow in the American College of Medical Practice Executives. Mary Pat has been providing free information and resources to physicians, care providers and medical practice executives since 2008. For questions about “The Complete Guide to Revenue Cycle Management” webinar, contact Mary Pat at (919) 370-0504.

Posted in: A Career in Practice Management, Collections, Billing & Coding, Compliance, Day-to-Day Operations, Finance, Medical Coding Education, Medicare & Reimbursement

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Why You Can’t Get An Annual Medicare Physical

Annual Physical 2In 2011, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid (CMS) unveiled a new benefit to address the need for annual care for seniors. It was widely hailed as a wonderful thing for Medicare patients who previously had no preventive care unless they paid out-of-pocket for a “complete physical.” What some people overlook is that the new Medicare benefit includes no actual physical examination of any kind.

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