Archive for Human Resources

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10 Books Every New Medical Practice Manager Should Read

 

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Daniel Pink recently published a list of 10 books every new manager should read. I’d like to spin his list into my own 10 books that I recommend for all new healthcare managers.

Dan’s pick #1: ‘Drive’ by Daniel H. Pink

I agree with his description:

In this best-selling business book, Pink explains why, contrary to popular belief, extrinsic incentives like money aren’t the best way to motivate high performance. Instead, employers should focus on cultivating in their workers a sense of autonomy, mastery, and purpose in order to help them succeed.

I have always felt that as a manager, my job is to make sure employees succeed, not look for the ways in which they fail.

Dan’s Pick #2: ‘The One Thing You Need to Know’ by Marcus Buckingham

I’ve not read this book, but I would replace it with my all-time recommendation The One Minute Manager’ by Ken Blanchard. I have given this book to scores of people that I’ve worked with over the years and I recommend it because it introduces you to the seminal concept of

“Praise immediately in public, critique later in private.”

I do agree on capitalizing on individual’s greatest strengths, but especially in small offices, one does not have the ability to craft jobs or tasks that play to one’s individual strengths. You can certainly search for those strengths during the recruiting phase, understanding what qualities often are reflected in those that are good at the front desk, in the exam room, etc.

Dan’s Pick #3: ‘Thinking, Fast and Slow’ by Daniel Kahneman

I had never heard of this book, but now I am anxious to read it. It sounds like it covers things I had to learn along the way, the hard way. Pink says:

Kahneman, a psychologist who won the Nobel Prize in economics, breaks down all of human thought into two systems: the fast and intuitive “System 1” and the slow and deliberate “System 2.” Using this framework, he lays out a number of cognitive biases that affect our everyday behavior, from the halo effect to the planning fallacy.

Dan’s Pick #4: ‘Act Like a Leader, Think Like a Leader’ by Herminia Ibarra

Right away I have to say that I was turned off by the notion that you can be too authentic at work,. Authenticity can be much more of a problem for women than for men. Dan says:

For example, Ibarra, a professor at business school INSEAD, suggests leaders act first and then think, so that they learn from experimentation and direct experience. There’s even an entire chapter devoted to the dangers of being too authentic at work.

Being authentic doesn’t mean wearing your emotions on your sleeve, or making all employees best friends. It does mean being the same person at work that you are at home. See my blog post “Should (Female Leaders Cry at Work?”

Try ‘Lean In: Women, Work and the Will to Lead’ by Sheryl Sandberg. Even if you’re a man. 

Dan’s Pick #5: ‘How to Win Friends and Influence People’ by Dale Carnegie

Couldn’t agree more! This is a classic and there’s a reason it’s a classic – it is a book that not just all healthcare managers should read, it’s a book that all humans should read. In case you can’t find the time or justification to read HTWF&IP, my mother-in-law’s homespun synopsis of the book is “You enter a room and say hello to everybody.” Got it?

Dan’s Pick #6: ‘Mindset’ by Carol Dweck

This is another book that had not crossed my path before, but one that sounds similar to #2, only applied to oneself. I would substitute ‘Blink: The Power of Thinking Without Thinking’ by Malcolm Gladwell for a slightly different take on listening to oneself to bolster confidence and self-learning. Actually, I recommend every one of Malcolm Gladwell’s books for a good read with powerful insights.

Dan’s Pick #7: ‘Meditations’ by Marcus Aurelius and Gregory Hays

To bring things into the 21st century, I suggest ‘Good Boss, Bad Boss: How to Be the Best…and Learn from the Worst’. Author Bob Sutton is a hero of mine, if only because he had the chutzpah to write ‘The No Asshole Rule’, which I live by in my business. One of the foundations of my consulting firm is that I don’t work with mean people. I’ve had to fire a few (clients) along the way, but not many.

Dan’s Pick #8: ‘Things Fall Apart’ by Chinua Achebe

If you didn’t cover this book in graduate school, or didn’t go to graduate school, pick up Crossing the Quality Chasm: A New Health System for the 21st Century’. It’s the book that changed the way we all look at healthcare and it’s good background reading for where we are today.

Dan’s Pick #9: ‘Now, Discover Your Strengths’ by Marcus Buckingham and Donald O. Clifton

Seems similar to Pick #2.

Dan’s Pick #10: ‘Good to Great’ by Jim Collins

Yes, and yes.

READERS: What books would you recommend to a new manager in healthcare?

Posted in: A Career in Practice Management, Human Resources, Leadership, Quality

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Why You Should Not Reward Your Billing Staff for Collections

I Don't Recommend You Incentivize Billing Staff for Collections!

Do not incentivize and reward your billing staff for reduced days in accounts receivable, increased collections or decreased non-contractual (bad debt) write-offs!

I bet you thought I was going to say that billers are paid to do a job and they should not be incentivized for doing the job you hired them to do.

Not true – I am not against incentivizing employees to do a job at all; most people enjoy a challenge and feel great when they reach a goal.

However, when a subset of employees in your practice is incentivized for increasing revenue, you can be sure it will create resentment and low morale for the rest of your employees. Do you think word won’t get around that you’re rewarding the billers? If so, you’re completely wrong. There are no secrets in a medical office. People know what others make, and regardless of what your Employee Handbook might say, it is not grounds for termination for employees to share what they make with others.

What I do encourage you to do is to incentivize your ENTIRE staff to reduce days in accounts receivable, increased collections and decrease non-contractual (bad debt) write-offs. Ultimately, your entire staff is responsible in one way or another for collections.

Consider how each person in your practice must contribute to the overall effort to make sure collections are at goal:

Front Desk: entering/verifying demographics and picking the right insurance plan for each patient; collecting the correct amount at time of service, whether it is an exact amount or an estimate of the patient’s responsibility.

Phones/Scheduling: making new patients aware of financial policies and what will be expected at time of service (“Please remember to bring the credit card you’d like us to keep on file for you”); making sure that Medicare patients know the difference between an Annual Wellness Visit and a Complete Physical.*

All clinical staff including Physicians/PAs/NPs: making sure that the patient signs an Advance Beneficiary Notice (ABN) for any services that insurance will not pay for, regardless of whether the patient is Medicare or non-Medicare**, before the service is rendered.

Manager: addressing patient complaints that escalate to you quickly and efficiently, not giving a patient any reason not to pay; making sure you have an easy-to-read-and-understand Financial Policy*** explaining your collection at time of service policy.

Everyone: embracing a culture of Customer Service, making sure that patients are satisfied with their experience; sending a consistent message to patients that you are interested in bringing them value for their dollars and reinforcing your desire to have an ongoing relationship with them.

Complete the Contact Form here to request any of the free resources discussed in this post and listed below.

  • *Cheat Sheet for Medicare visits
  • **Non-Medicare Advance Beneficiary Notice (ABN)
  • ***Financial Policy

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Posted in: Amazing Customer Service, Collections, Billing & Coding, Day-to-Day Operations, Finance, Human Resources

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A Manage My Practice Classic: Five Simple but Powerful Performance Evaluation Questions

Performance Review

This continues to be one of our top ranking posts of all time.

This tells me that people continue to struggle with the process of evaluating employee performance.

The point of the “Five Questions” evaluation is not to focus on the fact that the employee is often tardy or doesn’t complete assignments on time – those things should be initially dealt with outside of this process (remember the old adage “No new news at the performance evaluation.”) They can be added to #3 as goals, but the idea is to to dig under those things and see if the employee is dissatisfied, overwhelmed or under-challenged.

I typically use this form at 90 days after hire, then at the one year mark, then every 6 months thereafter.

Yes, evaluating this much is very time-consuming – but it pays BIG dividends.

Invest in your employees by using this form and meeting for at least an hour – you might be surprised that it’s one of the most in-depth evaluations you’ll ever do!

This is a VERY succinct performance evaluation that I’ve used for years. Called “Five Questions”, the employee completes it, submits it to the manager, then together they discuss, evaluate and add to it during the evaluation interview. Here are the questions:

  1. What goals did you accomplish since your last evaluation (or hire)?
  2. What goals were you unable to accomplish and what hindered you from achieving them?
  3. What goals will you set for the next period?
  4. What resources do you need from the organization to achieve these goals?
  5. Based on YOUR personal satisfaction with your job (workload, environment, pay, challenge, etc.) how would you rate your satisfaction from 1 (poor) to 10 (excellent.) 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

You do have to stress that question #5 is not how well they think they’re doing their job, but how satisfied they are with the job.

The great thing about this evaluation is that it is one piece of paper and not too intimidating. Staff can use phrases or sentences and write as little or as much as they like. If it’s hard to get a conversation going with the employee, ask them “What was your thought process when you assigned your job satisfaction a number __.” Usually that opens the floodgates!

If you use a goal-oriented evaluation like this one, you will find that employees will grasp that you are asking for their performance to be beyond the day-to-day tasks, and to focus on learning new skills, teaching others, creative thinking and problem-solving and new solutions for efficiency and productivity.

Posted in: Human Resources, Leadership, Manage My Practice Classics

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How Much Does a Nurse Practitioner Get Paid?

Nurse Practitioners (NPs) Are Sometimes Called Advance Practice Nurses (APNs)

I am often asked how much Nurse Practitioners in private medical practice should be paid.

This answer depends on a number of factors, not the least of which is the scope of practice for NPs in your state. Here are two handy links to laws for NPs in each state and what NPs in each state can and cannot do. 

In addition, NPs may make more or less depending on their duties, how much physician oversight they require, what the benefit package is, and if the NP will siphon off part of the existing providers’ practices, and therefore, income. Market rates are always important to review so an offer can be made that is somewhat comparable to other NP positions in the community, unless the work is less or more hours, less or more responsibility, etc.

Consider the following before making your offer:

Job Responsibilities

  • How many hours per week, on average, is the NP expected to work?
  • Will the NP take call?
  • Will the NP have his/her own patient panel?
  • Will the NP be expected to round on nursing home patients or hospital patients or admit or discharge patients (if allowed in your local hospitals)?
  • Will the NP staff a location without onsite physician support?
  • Will the NP be managing other staff or other mid-levels?

Support Required by the Physician

  • How much experience does the NP have overall, and how much in your specialty?
  • Will a physician be required to review some or all of the NP’s notes for sign-off for a defined period, or indefinitely?
  • Will the NP be able to write prescriptions for no drugs, some drugs or all drugs?
  • Will the NP see Medicare patients and thereby be limited to “incident-to” scheduling (the physician must see the patient initially and develop a care plan, then must see the patient every third visit for the initial problem, or every time a new problem is discussed.)

 Associated Costs with Hiring an NP

  • Wages: Base salary, any associated productivity bonuses
  • Benefits: paid time off, health insurance, life insurance, retirement matching (after one year), expense reimbursement (mileage, etc.)
  • Malpractice: many NPs and PAs may also want you to guarantee to pay for a malpractice “tail” when they leave your employment. They will need a tail only if your policy is claims made, which means they must pay for their own liability insurance after they leave you for acts when they worked with you. If you have an occurrence policy, it will pay if they were covered under the claim when the act happened, not when the suit was filed, so no tail is needed.
  • Licenses: Any software licenses for a new provider – some vendors equate NPs and PAs with a 1.0 FTE provider (full license fee) and other vendor equate them to a .5 FTE provider (1/2 license fee.)
  • Fees: Dues, licenses, subscriptions, DEA, memberships
  • Continuing Education: registration, travel, lodging, food, online CME, and do they get paid to take CME, or is CME paid for, but on their own time?
  • Electronics: Computer, laptop, tablet, iPad, smartphone, smartphone apps and add-ons
  • Medical Assistant: depending on your specialty the NP may need a FT medical assistant so they can be as productive as possible, or you may already have a medical assistant in-house that can be shared with the new NP. For some specialties, the NP may not need a medical assistant.
  • General Overhead: this is the biggest thing that practices overlook when they do not assign overhead costs to mid-level providers. All providers require a place to practice, staff assistants – clinical and/or administrative, equipment, medical consumables, etc. A percentage of the overhead should be considered an expense of employing the NP and should be accounted for before considering the NP to have made a profit for you during the year.
  • Marketing: how will you introduce the NP to the community and to your existing patients? Will you do a focused marketing campaign to encourage a target demographic to try the NP? Will you have an open house to introduce the NP to potential referrers in the community? Will you make contact with and provide flyers to assisted living facilities (Medicare) or daycares (pediatrics) or gyms (wellness, sports medicine, orthopedics) or other venues that match your target patient?
  • Miscellaneous Requests: signing bonus, office furniture, any special equipment based on personal characteristics or personal preferences (e.g. very short NPs may need a stool in each exam room or may request a hydraulic exam table), a computer at home for use when on call, relocation support, etc.
  • School Payback: There are programs available for school loan payback for mid-levels working in primary care and/or in underserved areas. This is a huge draw for many mid-level providers – take a minute and find out if these paybacks are available in your area. A new NP may be willing to take a little less in compensation if they are also eligible for loan forgiveness.

Things to Consider

  • What is the reason for adding an NP? To reduce other providers’ workload? To replace a retiring physician with a non-physician? To add a needed element to the practice (e.g. a female NP in an all-male practice or vice versa)? Improve the quality of life for existing providers (call, nursing home visits, discharges, etc.) Will an NP allow the group to bill for services previously billed outside the practice, such as first assist at surgery?
  • Will the NP make the market share pie bigger or take a piece of the existing market share pie? Has a projection been done to show the other physicians what their potential reduction in income will be if the NP takes part of the current market share? If the practice is going after new market share, how will this be achieved – general practice exposure vs niche marketing for a new service or something the NP brings to the table?
  • How much money will the practice have to expense before it sees a return on investment? How long will it take for the NP to cover his/her own expenses? How long will it take for the NP to cover expenses and bring additional income to the practice? Will additional formal or informal training be required? Will additional equipment for new services be required?
  • Reimbursement: What payers will pay the full allowable amount (billed under a physician) versus the allowable minus 15%?

Once you have considered everything above, take a look at the just-released 2015 National Nurse Practitioner Compensation Survey.

“Overall compensation for full-time nurse practitioners is on the rise, according to the American Association of Nurse Practitioners (AANP), which today released data from its 2015 National Nurse Practitioner Compensation Survey. The findings demonstrate that nurse practitioners who work 35 hours or more per week have seen average base salaries increase 6.3%, rising from $91,310 in 2011 to $97,083 in 2015, with total annual income increasing 10.0%, rising from $98,760 to $108,643. More than 2,200 nurse practitioners participated in the 2015 survey.”

The survey, which can be purchased for $50, shows the breakout of compensation based on education, experience, region, setting and specialty.

NOTE: If your practice needs helps running the numbers to see how adding an NP or PA will affect expenses and revenue, Manage My Practice has a Pro Forma Service which helps you to make a job offer knowing what your costs will be, how many patients need to be seen to cover costs and how soon after the hire the practice can potentially see a return on their investment. Contact us here or call Mary Pat at (919) 370.0504.

Photo Credit: Friends for Peace via Compfight cc

Posted in: Finance, Human Resources, Practice Marketing

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MMP Classic: How Many Staff Do You Need?

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Staffing your medical practice can be a daily balancing act.

There’s no simple formula for staffing that one can apply to every practice because each specialty and each situation requires something different. It is very important to right-size your staffing. Understaffing can cause patient dissatisfaction, frustration, burnout and a staff exodus. Overstaffing can cause lower productivity, reduction in profit and never really getting to the root of why some problems exist.

Matching FTE Providers to FTE Employees 

Most benchmarks utilize FTEs (full-time equivalents) which is an employee working a 40-hour week, or a provider working the number of hours considered full-time for providers. Although this works well for employees, it doesn’t always follow for providers. A .5 FTE provider that works two days a week may need more than a .5 clinical and .5 non-clinical person because patients still call for prescription refills and questions and test results still arrive to be reviewed on the days the provider is not there.

Back to basics

It helps to bring the equation down to the simplest formula of clinical and non-clinical staff. For now, disregard billing, lab, other ancillary services, management, and medical records and focus first on the number of staff needed to get the patient in the door (front desk), get the patient seen (clinic assistants), and get the patient out the door (front desk again.) 

Let’s imagine that Dr. Goodman is a full-time primary care physician with a mature practice and a full schedule. She works 4.5 days per week and has one non-clinical person who answers the phones, checks patients in, checks patients out and handles the medical records. She also has a clinical person who rooms the patient, performs the intake, and takes the vitals. The clinical person also answers patient phone calls with medical questions and contacts patients to give them their test results. Either employee may schedule tests and referrals for patients. Dr. Goodman has 2 full-time employees and if she’s really fortunate, both employees are interchangeable so each can fill in for the other if they want to take vacation or are sick for more than a few days, maybe with the help of a temp or a prn person if needed. If the practice has electronic medical records (EMR) and everything is as automated as possible, they can probably get by for short periods of time.

Most brand new practices start with just one employee who does all front office/administrative (reception, phones, registration, scheduling, referrals, time-of-service collections) and all back office/clinical (vitals, procedure prep and assistance, phlebotomy, injections, lab testing, patient call-backs.) As the practice grows, it becomes clear when a second employee is needed.

What about a practice with ancillaries or more providers?

Front desk as the number of providers grows, so does the need for more staff to check patients in or check patients out. Floating staff between these positions can be a temporary solution before adding full-time staff in both areas. Using a patient check-in kiosk can minimize the stress of checking-in many patients arriving simultaneously, and having patients register online or through a portal can save significant registration time.

 

Dedicated phone staff when employees are consistently pulled between answering the phone and working with the patient in front of them, it’s time to consider a separate phone position away from the front desk. Don’t overlook the possibility of having a remote employee taking calls from home full-time, or part-time during peak days and times.

 

“Nurse” triage if providers are seeing patients all day every day, clinical assistants may not have the capacity to answer phone calls between patients, or to manage the patient schedule. Nurse triage can keep the office flow even by deciding when patients need to come in for same day visits, answer questions, call patients with test results, and cover breaks for other clinical/non-clinical staff. Vaccines administered by the clinical staff can often be what determines when more staff is needed – if the clinical assistant is administering vaccines, s/he is not available to room the next patient. The appointment interval can be another defining factor in how many clinical staff are needed – the shorter the appointment intervals, the more help will be needed to keep the schedule moving.

 

Laboratory services can be as limited as the clinical person taking specimens, or as complex as a full-blown lab staffed with a full-time lab tech to draw blood and test it. Lab services are often determined by two factors – improved care for the patient (can the provider get test results during the visit that will assist in getting the patient diagnosed and on a treatment plan?) and convenience for the patient (how far will the patient have to go to get blood drawn at a lab?)

 

Referrals most primary care offices refer patients for lots of tests and if the process is not electronic and requires lots of time on the phone, you may need to dedicate a FTE person to this job if you have 3-4 providers.

 

Billing billing can be completely outsourced from the entering of charges to pushing accounts to collections, or it can be handled in-house. A typical ratio is one billing person to two providers for a practice that sends statements and one billing person to four providers if using credit card on file.

Imaging  for those offices that have onsite imaging, one employee is enough if there is another imaging facility close by. Depending on the imaging volume, some practices have mobile imaging services come to office once or twice a week, or have an imaging technician who can also perform other clinical duties.

Medical records  with the predominance of EMR, the designated medical record person has just about disappeared in smaller practices. Most remaining medical record functions (scanning mailed records, tracking down records from other providers or facilities, providing records to other providers, attorneys and to patients themselves) are performed by other staff as part of a litany of shared duties.

Management when does a practice need a manager? Well, that’s another post for another day, but typically a solo physician/provider does not need a manager, unless she has lots of ancillaries with lots of associated employees. A Fractional Administrator can offer part-time assistance that is enough to help a small but growing practice.

And in a specialist’s office: 

Surgery scheduling in some surgical practices, the clinical assistant does the scheduling while the physician is in surgery. Larger practices employ centralized surgery scheduling which usually takes 2 schedulers to make sure one scheduler is available at all times.

 

Specialized Testing  one technician is usually enough for each specialized testing modality, unless the practice is a referral center for other providers. The other exception is if the equipment, a nuclear camera for instance, is so expensive that the practice cannot afford to not be able to do tests if an employee is absent.

 

Why do some offices need more staff and some need less? 

Inefficiency requires more people! If people have to get out of their seats to solve a problem or get an answer, they’re inefficient. 

Systems and processes must support the work of the employees, not hinder it. Do your systems support your workflow?

Some physicians can keep two (or more) clinical assistants busy.

Some physician specialties order many more tests and need more staff to schedule them.

Poorly organized practices duplicate efforts, and in doing so, cause themselves more work. A good example of this is the patient calling the practice multiple times during the day when they do not get a callback, causing much more work than if the patient was called back within 2 hours.

What should you do if you can’t figure out if it’s taking too many people to do the work? 

  1. Do you know what every person is doing? Have everyone keep a log of all the jobs they do over the course of several weeks. Ask them to assign the percentage of time they spend doing each task. Evaluate their lists and see if staff are carrying equivalent workloads.
  2. Cross-train employees and see if jobs take more or less time when others do the tasks. There should be some variance, but not a significant variance.
  3. Is every task something that contributes to the practice? Does something absolutely need to be kept in two places in two formats? Are things being done because “we’ve always done them that way?” 
  4. Is one thing so far behind that it’s causing duplication of effort? Bring in a temp, ask staff to work on a Saturday, do whatever it takes to bring everyone back to ground zero again.
  5. Hold brainstorming sessions with staff and involve them in developing plans for improving efficiency. Also ask them one-on-one for their ideas for improvements.
  6. We expect more of everyone than we did before the economy tanked, and employees are responding by being more stressed and by being out sick more. Evaluate if everyone is out more than in the past and how that may be affecting the work. 
  7. Do a simple efficiency study by observing individual employees at work and documenting what they’re doing one minute at a time for a period of two hours. Graph the work by time to see what two hours of their day looks like. Some jobs are by nature “interruptable”, like phones, check-in and check-out, and some jobs are performed best when the employees are subjected to minimal interruption. Are these jobs defined in this way, or are the two interspersed creating inefficiencies?
  8. Try this exercise: create the ideal staff for your office as if you could afford every person you’d like to have. Then, start to work backwards, seeing how jobs could be combined and what positions would be nice, but not necessary. Compare the final product to what you have now, and see what the differences are. Another way to approach this is to pretend your practice doesn’t have the physical confines that it does, and see if you would staff it differently if the space was more accommodating.

Posted in: Day-to-Day Operations, Human Resources, Manage My Practice Classics

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Ch-Ch-Ch Changes: Endings & New Beginnings by Consultant Bob Cooper

Managing Change by Bob Cooper

As we pass Labor Day I find myself thinking about the transition from summer to fall, even though the fall season doesn’t officially begin for a few more weeks. It seems as if the pace starts to pick up again. Vacations come to an end, students return to school, and business tends to accelerate.

Change is a constant. Why do some people embrace change and others struggle?

After all, we know that the seasons change, one ends and a new one begins. In business, projects come to an end, and new ones begin. Changes in expectations, new technologies, increased competition, reduced margins are just a few examples of the changes businesses face today.

As a leader, it is very important that you take a good look in the mirror and reflect on how you embrace change.  As a model for others, you set the tone for how your team will be able to demonstrate resilience when facing the business headwinds.

In order for you to assist others to move through the changing seasons, you need to understand what happens to others when facing change. Change is external to the individual. A new boss, revised policy, or a new role become understood once explained to staff.  However, individuals react to changes differently.  The reason for this is some team members psychologically struggle to come to terms with the change.  They find it difficult to make the internal transition.  In my experience, the number one reason for this is fear. Perhaps they are not confident in their ability to deliver on the change.  They may be hesitant to take a risk due to a fear of failure. They don’t feel as safe or secure.

Questions you should ask yourself during times of change.

What do my team members need to let go of?

What do they feel they are losing?

Transitions require endings. Great leaders understand that certain changes have a big impact on individuals. Some individual’s self-esteem is tied to the old process. They may have felt an enormous sense of pride in what they had accomplished.  Great leaders effectively assist others to work through these endings, and become comfortable with transition.

The following are a few suggestions to assist others through change and transition:

  1. Explain what is changing and why it is changing. Let others know what is not changing.
  2. Allow staff to express concern, and show empathy for anyone struggling to embrace the change. Be tolerant of mistakes. Mentor others to turn mistakes into opportunities for learning and growth.
  3. Maintain ongoing two-way communication throughout the change process.
  4. Engage others in making the change work.  Listen to staff ideas and incorporate suggestions that are beneficial for the business.
  5. Be positive and promote a feeling of optimism.

Great leaders assist team members to come to terms with their endings, and work hard to help others to find new beginnings. Things will not be the same, but as a leader you can help staff to develop the competence and confidence to move forward.

You will be able to assist most team members to move through the changing seasons and find comfort in new beginnings, if you move through the transition yourself.  If you are stuck in the summer, as we embark on the fall, how can you expect your team to turn the page?

Great leaders treat each and every team member as a unique individual who experiences change in their own way. Without judgment, great leaders meet staff wherever they need to be met.  Some staff become the champions of certain changes, and others need a lot more attention.

One of the most important lessons in leadership (and in life) is to treat every person you meet with total respect regardless of how they deal with the seasons of change. Not everyone can be the “A” student, but they all deserve to be in the classroom.  An individual may ultimately need to leave the room, but this should be handled with complete respect, understanding and compassion.

Bob Cooper: We are very pleased to announce that in collaboration with Consulting For A Cause, we will be providing another one day “Discovery Session” on Thursday, October 17 in Chappaqua, NY.  You will be provided with the opportunity to capture in your personal journal the following – how to turn talents into sustainable strengths, lead a life with purpose and passion, achieve quantum leaps in performance, brand yourself for future success, achieve a sense of work-life balance, and how to effectively execute your business strategies. Space is limited. To register, please go towww.consultingforacause.com

For a complete listing of our services, including our books “Huddle Up”, “Leadership Tips to Enhance Staff Satisfaction and Retention”, and “Heart and Soul in the Boardroom” please visit us at www.rlcooperassoc.com or call (845) 639-1741.

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Posted in: Day-to-Day Operations, Human Resources, Leadership

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Ten Golden Rules for Every Medical Practice – A Manage My Practice Classic

Important Rules for Employees

 

Although I originally created this list for medical practices in 2009 and republished it in 2011, I think it still stands true today and applies to all workplace situations.

Sometimes employees do not understand or follow the most basic workplace guidelines. Here is a simple but comprehensive list that you can tweak to make your own. It covers about 25 basics in a short list of ten “Golden Rules.” Make it part of each job description or personnel handbook and/or post it in strategic places.

Report to work on time daily.

Be ready at your desk to begin work at the designated time. Leave promptly for lunch and return to work when you should, unless you’ve made special arrangements with your supervisor. Take breaks on the honor system and do not abuse the privilege. Clock in and out faithfully.

Command respect…

….from the physicians, managers and employees of (your practice/business name here) by demonstrating total professionalism in the workplace with your dress, your demeanor and conversation. Represent the business/practice in a way that would make your Mother and your boss proud of you. Treat your co-workers as you would like to be treated.

Be economical…

…by not wasting time or supplies or doing sloppy work that must be re-done.

Give every customer/patient your total attention, patience and courtesy.

Do not assume you know what the customer/patient is going to say, but listen carefully to the patient (in-person or on the phone) so you can assist them to the best of your ability. Remember how good it feels to be the center of someone’s attention and give that gift to every single patient.

Keep your supervisor aware…

…of any problems in your workload, whether too much or too little. Do not expect your supervisor to know if you are falling behind or caught up.

Document…

…all interactions with customers/patients and other businesses/medical facilities to assist your co-workers in knowing what you have done, and document your resolution of the situation to the customer’s satisfaction.

Strive for a positive attitude every single day.

Don’t whine.

Be a team player.

This means both covering for your co-workers and knowing that they will cover you. This means supporting your co-workers to their faces and behind their backs. This means having (your business/practice name here) goals for your goals, and knowing that your success will be your team’s success, and ultimately, the success of the business/practice.

Clean up your own messes…

…and act as an adult acts in the workplace: responsibly, maturely, and with thought for others. Accept blame for your own mistakes, knowing that everyone makes them, and that if no one is making any mistakes, nothing is improving.

Contribute…

…to making (your business practice name here) a good place to work. Only you can create a place where everyone enjoys working. Only you can make this place a good place to be.

 

For more medical office rules, read 21 Common Sense Rules for Medical Offices.

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(Photo Credit: Gord McKenna via Compfightcc)

Posted in: Amazing Customer Service, Day-to-Day Operations, Human Resources, Manage My Practice Classics

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Everyone Is Essential: Guest Author Bob Cooper

Obama Fist Bump with JanitorSome organizations will use the terms essential and non-essential workers as a way to distinguish between who needs to be on site in the event of an emergency, and who does not. I do understand the purpose of this distinction, however, it’s very important that businesses not give the impression that some employees are more important or valuable than others. (more…)

Posted in: A Career in Practice Management, Amazing Customer Service, Day-to-Day Operations, Human Resources, Leadership, Quality

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Project Management for New Supervisors: Guest Post by Donna Izor

It Takes a Village to Complete a Project!As a consultant, I have been asked to go into many organizations where I have found important projects lingering or causing such stress for a supervisor that they feel paralyzed.  No one is happy.  Not the leader asking for results or the supervisor who is feeling overwhelmed.

Regularly scheduled meetings with your leader should be your norm.

Make an agenda for this meeting so that you are sure to cover all important issues.  Use this time to go over project lists, comment on what you feel are your priorities, and give project updates.  Having a discussion on the priority of the work will help you gain insight to the “bigger picture” and how your work affects the overall organization.

The following steps provide a framework for supervisors having difficulty moving forward with a project.

(more…)

Posted in: Day-to-Day Operations, Human Resources, Leadership

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A Manage My Practice Classic: Words and Phrases to Use in Performance Evaluations

One of my favorite books of all time is “Effective Phrases for Performance Appraisals, A Guide to Successful Evaluations” by James E. Neal, Jr.  I have purchased many editions of this book through the years and I typically supply a copy of it to everyone in my practice who performs evaluations.

The contents of this book include:

  • Effective Phrases (in 63 categories including accuracy, development, interpersonal skills, and motivation)
  • Two Word Phrases (such as competing priorities, diversified approaches, fully prepared and team performance)
  • Helpful Adjectives (such as adaptable, capable, perceptive, and systematic)
  • Helpful Verbs (such as accomplishes, adheres, determines, and establishes)
  • Performance Rankings (such as exceptional, unsatisfactory, and distinguished)
  • Time Frequency (such as always, usually, rarely and seldom)
  • Guidelines for Successful Evaluations (rate objectively, use significant documentation and factual examples, plan for the appraisal interview, emphasize future development, and emphasize the positive)
No manager should be without this book! Click here to purchase a new or used copy of the book on Amazon.
For a simple, 5 question performance evaluation, click here.

Posted in: Day-to-Day Operations, General, Human Resources, Leadership, Manage My Practice Classics

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