Archive for Amazing Customer Service

image_pdfimage_print

Advance Beneficiary Notice FAQs

The advance beneficiary notice (ABN) is a powerful tool for practices to educate patients about their benefits and responsibilities for Medicare non-covered services. Many of our readers still write us to ask questions about the form and the correct way to use it in the office, so we developed this Frequently Asked Questions list for the ABN to clear up some of the confusion.

We always tell the physicians we work with: “If you are going to accept insurance, you need to be the expert on insurance.” In practice this means knowing your patient’s benefits and working with them to communicate with them about what, if anything, they will owe before or after payer adjudication. No one enjoys being surprised about money!

The ABN is also a tremendous opportunity to talk about financial responsibilities with a patient. If you don’t have a credit card on file program in your practice, it’s important to be proactive about patient financial responsibilities and how they will be handled. Having a patient sign that they understand they will be financially responsible for payment for a non-covered service is a natural way to start that process.

Here are some of your most frequently asked ABN questions.

What is the ABN? What does it do?

The ABN was originally developed by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) to make sure Medicare patients were aware that if they received services that were not covered by Medicare, payment for these services would be their responsibility. By signing the ABN, the patient agrees that if Medicare (or other payer) does not pay the physician then the patient will have to pay for it. The document affirms that the patient knows they could be required to pay out of pocket. Once the ABN is signed, if you are sure Medicare won’t pay you can (and probably should) collect the patient portion listed on the form immediately. You can charge in full for the services if the ABN is signed, however the service is self-pay at that point, so I always suggest you charge your self-pay rate.

What won’t Medicare pay for?

The classic example is an annual physical, which many people assume is part of their Medicare coverage. Medicare will pay for an initial “Welcome to Medicare” visit, as well as an “Annual Wellness” visit, but the key word to hear is “visit”. These are not physical examinations. If a patient wants a physical, they will need to sign an ABN before the service saying they understand that Medicare will not pay for it. Other things that Medicare will not pay for include services without specific medical need, like labs or imaging diagnostics without diagnoses that are accepted as medically necessary. Medicare will also only pay for certain services at regular intervals, for example women who are considered “low risk” for cervical cancer can only receive a pap smear every 24 months. Note that you are not required by Medicare to get an ABN signed for services that are never covered, such as the annual physical, however, it pays to be absolutely clear when discussing payments, so I suggest you get an ABN signed by the patient regardless.

Should we just have everybody sign an ABN?

No. The ABN is to be used in specific instances for a specific service. You cannot require a patient to sign a “blanket” ABN for the year, just in case. If Mr. Smith wants a service that Medicare is unlikely to, or definitely will not pay for and the physician is comfortable ordering or performing the service, a staff member should present an ABN to Mr. Smith for that specific day’s procedure, before it is performed. If the patient is a having a series of recurring services that will not be covered, you can have one ABN signed for up to twelve months of the specific service. An example of this might be a series of physical therapy sessions.  The ABN is not a catch- all to protect from denial, however, and persistent misuse will not only be denied, but could open the door to an audit.

We are a small, busy practice; that sounds like a lot of work!

It is a lot of work for a practice! Many practices choose to not use the ABN rather then work out a protocol to implement it. The practice has to have a system in place so that the physician or staff member can explain the situation, fill out the form, answer the patient’s questions and file the ABN for posterity (they have to be kept seven years, like other records). It can be the physician in a micropractice, or a dedicated billing or customer service employee in a larger setting. Also, a note has to be made of the ABN signing in the patient’s chart so that modifiers can be added to the CPT codes for billing.

Are ABNs for Medicare only?

No. You can also have a patient sign an ABN for a private payer. This helps the patient to understand that if their insurance doesn’t cover the service specified, the patient will have to pay for it.  Medicare requires an ABN be signed in order to bill the patient, but for patients with private insurance it’s still a great opportunity to talk about non-covered services, deductibles, copays, coinsurance or any past balances if you haven’t already. A few private payers actually require a waiver/ABN to bill patients for non-covered services – check your contract to be sure.

 

Mary Pat has created a generic non-Medicare ABN; if you’d like a copy, just email Mary Pat and she can send you one.

Posted in: Amazing Customer Service, Collections, Billing & Coding, Compliance, Day-to-Day Operations, Finance, Medicare & Reimbursement

Leave a Comment (0) →

Why You Should Not Reward Your Billing Staff for Collections

I Don't Recommend You Incentivize Billing Staff for Collections!

Do not incentivize and reward your billing staff for reduced days in accounts receivable, increased collections or decreased non-contractual (bad debt) write-offs!

I bet you thought I was going to say that billers are paid to do a job and they should not be incentivized for doing the job you hired them to do.

Not true – I am not against incentivizing employees to do a job at all; most people enjoy a challenge and feel great when they reach a goal.

However, when a subset of employees in your practice is incentivized for increasing revenue, you can be sure it will create resentment and low morale for the rest of your employees. Do you think word won’t get around that you’re rewarding the billers? If so, you’re completely wrong. There are no secrets in a medical office. People know what others make, and regardless of what your Employee Handbook might say, it is not grounds for termination for employees to share what they make with others.

What I do encourage you to do is to incentivize your ENTIRE staff to reduce days in accounts receivable, increased collections and decrease non-contractual (bad debt) write-offs. Ultimately, your entire staff is responsible in one way or another for collections.

Consider how each person in your practice must contribute to the overall effort to make sure collections are at goal:

Front Desk: entering/verifying demographics and picking the right insurance plan for each patient; collecting the correct amount at time of service, whether it is an exact amount or an estimate of the patient’s responsibility.

Phones/Scheduling: making new patients aware of financial policies and what will be expected at time of service (“Please remember to bring the credit card you’d like us to keep on file for you”); making sure that Medicare patients know the difference between an Annual Wellness Visit and a Complete Physical.*

All clinical staff including Physicians/PAs/NPs: making sure that the patient signs an Advance Beneficiary Notice (ABN) for any services that insurance will not pay for, regardless of whether the patient is Medicare or non-Medicare**, before the service is rendered.

Manager: addressing patient complaints that escalate to you quickly and efficiently, not giving a patient any reason not to pay; making sure you have an easy-to-read-and-understand Financial Policy*** explaining your collection at time of service policy.

Everyone: embracing a culture of Customer Service, making sure that patients are satisfied with their experience; sending a consistent message to patients that you are interested in bringing them value for their dollars and reinforcing your desire to have an ongoing relationship with them.

Complete the Contact Form here to request any of the free resources discussed in this post and listed below.

  • *Cheat Sheet for Medicare visits
  • **Non-Medicare Advance Beneficiary Notice (ABN)
  • ***Financial Policy

Image by Samuel Zeller

Posted in: Amazing Customer Service, Collections, Billing & Coding, Day-to-Day Operations, Finance, Human Resources

Leave a Comment (0) →

MMP Classic: How to Apologize to a Patient

Sincerely Apologizing to Patients

I like to get complaints from patients.

No, I’m not a glutton for punishment. What I like about complaints is that I hear directly from the patient what is bothering them, and I have an opportunity to connect with them personally. The ideal situation is having the opportunity to meet face-to-face with the patient when they are in the office.

Here’s how to apologize to a patient.

Step One: Introduce Yourself

I introduce myself and shake the patient’s hand and the hand of anyone else in the room.

Step Two: Sit Down

I sit down. There are two reasons for that. One is to send the message that they do not need to hurry – this conversation can take as long as they need it to. The second is to place myself physically below the patient. If they are in an exam room sitting on the exam table, I will sit in the chair. If they are sitting in the chair, I will sit on the step to the exam table. The message I am sending is “I do not consider myself to be above you.” It sends a strong message.

Step Three: Let Them Tell Their Story

I say “I understand we have not done a very good job with __________ (returning your calls, giving you an appointment, getting your test results back to you, etc.) Can you tell me about it?” I do not take notes as I want to maintain eye contact and focus on the patient, but I take good mental notes. The patient and/or anyone with them needs to be able to talk as long as they want. They might need to tell their story twice or many times to get to the point where they’ve gotten relief. The patient has to get the problem off their chest before the next part can happen.

Step Four: SINCERELY Apologize

I apologize, saying “I’d like to apologize on behalf of the practice and the staff that this happened. I want you to know this is not the way we intend for _______ to work in the practice.” If anything unusual has been happening, a policy has changed, or new staff have been hired, I let them know by saying “So-and-so has just happened, but that’s not your problem. We know our service has slipped, but we’re hoping we are on the way to getting it fixed.”

Don’t forget that patients can tell if you are not being sincere when you apologize.

Step Five: Answer Questions

Answer any questions the patient has. Why did the policy change? Why can’t I get an appointment when I need one? How will you fix this for me?

Step Six: Close the Meeting

If the patient complaint requires an investigation and resolution, I give the patient a date when I will be back in touch with more information. If the patient complaint does not require any resolution on the patient side, I offer my name again and give them a business card or a way for them to contact me if they have further problems.

Step Seven: Resolve the Situation

I follow-up on the information the patient has given me to find out where the system broke down or where a new system might need to be developed, and if needed, contact the patient with further information and/or resolution.

Although most people prefer not to hear complaints, paying close attention to patient complaints helps a manager to keep a pulse on the practice, know what patients are struggling with, and of course, practice humility. All good stuff.

Photo Credit: CarbonNYC [in SF!] via Compfight cc

Posted in: Amazing Customer Service, Manage My Practice Classics

Leave a Comment (0) →

Bringing Physicians and Patients Together Via Smartphone? Dr.Church Has An App For That!

Text to Doctor

I am always excited when physicians design products for other physicians because they “get it.” Here’s the tale of a Midwest physician, Dr. Fred Church, who has developed  a free app  to communicate one-on-one with his patients via email or text.

Mary Pat: Dr. Church, tell me how you came to design e-Consult My Doctor, an app that lets physicians and patients communicate with the ease of email and text in a secure environment.
Dr. Church: I suppose the axiom of “necessity is the mother of all innovation/invention” applies here. I saw a growing need and had a growing entrepreneurial passion to solve the problem for more physician-patient interaction between scheduled visits. I believe we are at the precipice of still greater demand for mobile connectivity and services in America.
The premise of private communications to enhance doctor-patient relationships is not a novelty, but how to do it in a HIPAA-compliant manner that is also is simple and convenient is a significant challenge. We are delivering an elegant smartphone app that uniquely understands a busy doctor’s and patient’s lives and works to serve them. We have created a utility that enables any doctor to be a concierge-service doctor and every patient to be the beneficiary of that great personalized care – care that is direct from the doctors that know them and whom they trust.
Mary Pat: You describe e-Consult My Doctor as a tool to augment the physician-patient relationship, not replace the traditional office visit. Can you give some examples of this?

Dr. Church: In no way is our communication management tool intended to replace the face-to-face interaction and assessment between a physician and his established patient.  We have terms of service that users will explicitly understand and agree to prior to participation. Doctors will not have to worry about this being crystal clear to patients. Most reasonable people understand that emergency situations need to be dealt with in-person and this tool is not intended to deliver emergency communications.   Example Scenarios: 

  1. “Doctor, can you give me an evaluation of this mole as I think it has changed since you last saw me for my physical? You told me to watch it and document it myself on my phone… should I be seeing you now or wait until my next physical?”
  2. “Surgeon, I am three days post-op and it’s Sunday afternoon and I’m scheduled to see you tomorrow for follow-up.  Can you take a look at these two pictures of my wound to tell me if I need to go to the urgent care or ER tonight before tomorrow’s follow-up? I’m not alarmed but a little concerned at how it looks and I want to have your opinion before my scheduled follow-up.”
  3. “Doctor, one month ago I described to you during Betsy’s well-child visit the rare sounds and behavior changes I was hearing and seeing from my 3 month-old daughter and felt like I was having difficulty adequately explaining it to you. Guess what, I was able to capture it on this video with audio.  Can you listen to it and tell me your opinion if I should be concerned about it? Should I bring her back in after you view this so you can examine her again and/or do more lab workup?”
  4. “Doctor, we talked about considering certain omega 3 supplements and I want your opinion on this particular supplement (see picture of label) from XYZ that the pharmacist recommended. Do you think it’s a good one also?  I appreciate your opinion before my next follow up with you.”

Mary Pat: Foremost in everyone’s mind is the privacy and confidentiality of texting and emailing – how does e-Consult My Doctor achieve HIPAA compliance? 

Dr. Church: Our smartphone app technology uses best practice standards for data at rest and in transit using AES 256-bit encryption. Doctors and patients will have a secure login to their app so that if their phone is stolen or misplaced, the data is still encrypted and cannot be viewed without a user’s password. If a user’s account is somehow compromised, administratively we can suspend his account, his e-consulting relationships, and access to the information between those relationships.

Mary Pat: Do you see this product replacing the traditional function of a nurse triage in the medical practice?

Dr. Church: Absolutely not. In fact, it is intended to offload the burden that triage is often overwhelmed with. Traditional healthcare will always need people to properly triage communications at a doctor’s office.  Unfortunately, high volumes and increased costs mean that calls are not always responded to in a timely way. Doctors need communication tools that are portable and flexible and this describes e-Consult My Doctor.

Mary Pat: Your software has some interesting features, including a mini-EMR or PHR (Personal Health Record.) Can you describe the benefits of a mini-EMR available from a smartphone?

Dr. Church: Because our solution is much less complex than an EHR (Electronic Health Record), a single adult patient user may keep and manage all of his dependents’ information on one app securely. Our well-designed smartphone app stores all related health event reminders, vaccine history, and PHR information. The PHR on our smartphone app is viewable/editable without the requirement of an internet connection, which is a clear advantage over EHR portals.  When patients participate in managing their information and updating their PHR data between visits, it makes it easier for intake nurses/staff during scheduled visits to make sure the EHR’s data is also reflecting recent changes that may be more current than EHR updates from various sources: other urgent cares/ERs, other specialty doctors, other health providers/doctors/sub-specialists (DDS, DC, DPM, etc.), hospitals etc. One of the main advantages of patients participating in their own PHR information is it will hopefully improve PHR accuracy, contribute to better patient compliance, and help serve both patients and doctors in traditional healthcare delivery.

Mary Pat: How does the documentation of the communication between the physician and the patient get back into the practice EMR?

Dr. Church: The app will allow for exporting content via PDF and both doctors and patients will have their own copy of e-consultation data on their apps. Doctors may elect to attach the PDF of the e-consultation interaction to their respective EHR if they believe it is important enough and pertinent to a patient’s long-term record. For example, several EHRs do not have the ability to import pictures, audio, and video content which this app will easily store for minimal convenience fees.  Additionally, a doctor can simply summarize the exchange in her next scheduled office visit’s documentation if she feels the content is important enough. This will vary on an individual case-by-case basis and will be up to the doctor’s judgment.

Mary Pat: Between the secure communication and the mini-EMR, e-Consult My Doctor sounds very much like a patient portal. Can your software replace a patient portal for a medical practice?

Dr. Church: The mission of our software is to deliver a different and simpler solution for convenient communication and to augment the functionality of an EHR’s patient portal. An EHR patient portal is valuable for a singular patient to see what his doctor’s EHR documents as his current information including labs, vitals, etc.  The e-Consult My Doctor app will allow direct one-to-one communication any time and anywhere the doctor and patient are willing to participate.  One of the foundational premises of our product is that a doctor’s extra time and effort should be rewarded directly by the beneficiary… like having pay-as-you-go access to their mobile phone or email for enhanced, personalized care between scheduled visits.

Mary Pat: You have essentially designed a product that allows physicians to be reimbursed for care that they have been previously providing for free. Some patients will appreciate the convenience and be willing to pay for the personal attention and others will think it is akin to the airlines charging for luggage! How do you answer those who think healthcare is already too expensive without any additional fees? 

Dr. Church: I’m amazed how many people are willing to pay for the $1,000 – $2000 per patient per year for 24/7/365 access that they may only utilize a few times a year. I personally know concierge doctors who are eagerly looking forward to our HIPAA-compliant solution that will help them achieve better work-family life balance with our communication management tool.  We believe our smartphone app will bring a revolutionary solution that allows every doctor and every patient to participate in a concierge e-consulting relationship at a potentially lower price point. Our solution eliminates the middleman with a convenient and simple solution at a very affordable price and payment is directly and immediately received by the doctor.

Mary Pat: When will this product be available on the market and what will it cost physicians to purchase?

Dr. Church: The anticipated market delivery date is November 30, 2013. The app will be free and the basic subscription level will also be free. Users will be given a limited amount of secure storage space and may upgrade to larger amounts based on their individual needs. We will also offer a premium subscription level that will afford a larger secure space allotment and additional valuable service offerings. Our app will offer a pay-as-you-go, transactional model for the basic subscription level and a fixed-price price point for the value-minded user who wants more. Fred Church

Mary Pat: How can readers get in line to try your app?

Dr. Church: They can go to  http://e-ConsultMyDoctor.com and sign up for pre-launch information and be the first to try it out.  We invite physicians who want to be beta-testers!

Posted in: Amazing Customer Service, Electronic Medical Records, Innovation, Learn This: Technology Answers, Practice Marketing, Social Media

Leave a Comment (0) →

Are Patients Lost in Translation? An Interview With Dr. Charles Lee of Polyglot

Universal Medication Schedule (UMS)
Sometimes you find the most amazing things in your own backyard. In Research Triangle Park, NC, I found the wonderful Dr. Chuck Lee, President and Founder of Polyglot. I was bemoaning the lack of good translation software for healthcare and Sims Preston, CEO of Polyglot, contacted me on LinkedIn and invited me to see their product Meducation. I was fascinated by Dr. Lee’s story and I think you will be too.

Mary Pat: Dr. Lee, you had a very personal reason for starting a healthcare company that focuses on communication in different languages, didn’t you?

Dr. Lee: First, as a clinician, I’ve always believed that we need to help all our patients understand their health information so that they can make better health decisions.  To me, it’s just common sense that better health outcomes starts with better informed patients.  The challenge is that much health information is not usually written with the patient in mind.  It’s often written in high grade reading levels using medical jargon, and often only available in English.  If it is available in another language, it’s usually only in Spanish.

About one of every three US adults has some difficulty understanding health information and almost 30 million struggle with the English language – almost 10 percent.  Because I am a first generation Korean immigrant – I came to the US when I was 7 years old – I saw how my grandmother struggled to understand how to take her medications.  This is one of the reasons I became interested in this issue.

Mary Pat: How did your own experiences drive your vision for your company ‘Polyglot”?

Dr. Lee: It became very apparent that other HIT companies had little interest in serving the needs of minority populations – they said that there’s not much money in it.  They said it was too difficult, too costly, and that the market wasn’t big enough.  If you look just at the numbers, yes it may not make sense – but how do we continue to ignore almost 10 percent of the population – thirty percent if you count low health literacy! That’s when I decided to form Polyglot Systems to show that creating technology to support language and cultural needs of underserved populations doesn’t have to be hard or costly.  If our small company can do it, the big guys will have no excuse.

Mary Pat: Can you talk about the state of healthcare communication for non-English speakers in the United States today?

Dr. Lee: Just think about what it would be like for you if you were in another country and they didn’t speak English.  If you got sick and needed medical care, would you know how to read the signs? Know where to go? Know what forms you are signing? Know what the doctors were saying? What your treatment choices are? Or how to take your medicine if the bottle didn’t have English instructions?  That gives you a glimpse into what it’s like for non-English speakers in the US.

After I saw my grandmother’s pill bottles with instructions written in English that she couldn’t read, I became aware that this was not an isolated incident.  So I asked myself this: How many medication errors are caused by language barriers? Last year there were about 4 billion prescription written – that’s not including over-the-counter medications.  Just based on statistics, that would mean about 400 million prescription were given to patients who are limited English proficient.  The need was obvious.  If you include English-speaking patients who have difficulty understanding health information, this number approaches 1.5 billion prescriptions.  Have you seen some of instruction they give you at pharmacies? Even I can’t understand what much of it says.  Also, a lot of the instructions are printed in such small print that I had a hard time reading them.  So one of the features we built into Meducation was larger font support for elderly and visually impaired patients.

Mary Pat: It seems that the timing for Meducation is perfect based on the recent emphasis on patient engagement, eliminating waste in healthcare, and increasing medication compliance. How does Meducation address these?

Dr. Lee: For me, it all comes down to common sense.  We submitted our first grant proposal to the NIH for Meducation almost 10 years ago – when all those issues you mentioned should still have been issues back then, they just weren’t popular things to talk about then.

Healthcare statistics usually say that a minority of the population utilizes the majority of our healthcare resources. This includes those with heart disease, diabetes, CHF, etc.  Do we ignore them because they are the minority? Of course not.  I bet you that a significant portion of the patients with heart disease, diabetes, CHF have low health literacy and/or language barriers.  If we can make even a few percent improvements in these populations, wouldn’t it be worth doing? This just made sense to me.

I sometimes like to compare our healthcare system to the cable industry.  The cable companies spend tremendous amount on research and expense for laying fiber-optic cables in streets in front our homes.  But unless we can connect the home to the corner – what they call “the last mile” – it means nothing.  It’s the same in healthcare. Unless patients understand and act to self-manage their own condition, all our advances in healthcare will have little effect.  Patient engagement is the last mile.

Mary Pat: How does Meducation interface with EMRs?

Dr. Lee: This is our biggest challenge now.  We’ve developed APIs to make it easy for EMRs to request and download our multi-language patient information.  The difficulty has been getting many of the EMR vendor’s attention.  They are so preoccupied with Meaningful Use and certifications that they have paid little attention to patient education and engagement.  But I predict that this will start to turn around as reimbursements will force them to do so.

Mary Pat: Meducation also has videos with demonstrations on medication techniques. What types of videos are available and how can patients view them at home?

Dr. Lee: The videos focus on techniques for taking complex medicines such as inhalers, eye drops, etc., so the patients are actually benefiting from the medicine and not wasting it by using it incorrectly.  We want to expand these to include other techniques such as wound care, port care, etc. in the future.  The demos are free to patients if their healthcare provider or pharmacies use Meducation. Patients receive a card with the website and video ID so they can view it as often as they like at home.

Mary Pat: Meducation uses a universal graphic that shows patients when to take medication which seems like a great idea for communication despite the language the patient speaks – can you talk about this?

Universal Medication Schedule (UMS)

Dr. Lee: Yes, this is called the Universal Medication Schedule (UMS).  It was developed by a group of health literacy researchers at Northwestern University and Emory University.  It breaks up medication times into four times of day: morning, noon, evening, and bedtime. Over 90% of all daily meds can fit into this schedule and make taking medicines much easier to follow.  The Institute of Medicine (IOM), the American College of Physicians (ACP), and most recently the National Council for Prescription Drug Programs (NCPDP) have recommended its use.  I really like it because it helps patients remember with pictures if they have difficulty understanding written instructions.

Mary Pat: You use the word “affordable” as part of your mission for Polyglot. I am always seeking solutions that are affordable in healthcare. Can you talk about the cost of Meducation for a solo primary care physician?

Dr. Lee: You know, I wish I could give this away for free to everyone.  But we have to make this a sustainable effort.  I’ve seen so many good projects die because they didn’t have a plan to keep it funded and going beyond the grant or some other funding source.  This is one of the reasons I left academics to start our Polyglot.  That being said, our products need to be affordable for front line providers – safety nets and federally qualified health centers (FQHCs) – because they interact most often with underserved patients – and have the least financial resources.

For provider practices, the subscription list price is $50/mo for unlimited use.  That’s less than $2 day for the ability to print instructions for all your patients in 16 languages – including elderly English-speaking patients in larger fonts.  As a comparison, $2 is about what it cost to use a telephone interpreter for about 1 minute.  Mary Pat, we would be happy to provide your readers a discount on Meducation.  Just have them contact me at lee@pgsi.com.

Mary Pat: What other projects do you have planned for the future?

Dr. Lee: I think the opportunities to improve communication for patients are only limited by our imagination.  There is so much that we can do create quality literacy and language solutions and deliver it inexpensively to a wide audience.  We are currently working on a solution to reduce hospital readmission through simplified multi-language discharge instructions that can be individualized for each patient.  We are adapting this for use during home care visits as well.

Charles Lee, MD, President and Founder of Polyglot
Dr. Lee: Polyglot Systems was founded in 2001 to help our US medical community care for the 26 million Americans who are unable to communicate effectively in English. Our mission is to deliver solutions that eliminate communication barriers at every stage of the medical encounter – improving the experience of both the patient and health care provider.

For more information about Meducation, Dr. Lee invites you to visit the Polyglot websiteHe is extending a discount on Meducation to readers of this article – please contact him at lee@pgsi.com.

For another post on communicating with patients, read my post “Can Patient Safety Be Improved By Asking Three Questions?” here.

Posted in: Amazing Customer Service, Compliance, Day-to-Day Operations, Electronic Medical Records, Innovation, Quality

Leave a Comment (2) →

5 Ways Technology Can Help Your Patient Relationship Management

Using Technology to Improve Patient Relationship ManagementPatient relationship management is about more than just healthcare issues; it’s about building a connection that leaves your patients feeling that you genuinely have their personal interests in mind. We all love to be recognized, and your patients appreciate it when you recall what their children’s names are, what you discussed with them during their previous visit, and where they went for their vacation.

It’s pretty impossible to keep track of everything if you have several hundred patients, however. That’s where technology can help you. Remember the old box of patient card files on which you’d make notes? Now, keeping track is just so much easier with the various tools available to physicians.

#1: Keep Electronic Records

If you’re a typical technophobe and don’t relate well to unfamiliar software programs, your record-keeping can be as easy as a Word or Text document for each patient. Set up a template for yourself that lists the data you want to keep track of, and simply enter the information into the file after each patient visit. Information could include fields such as:

  • Personal info
  • Family details
  • Chronic illnesses
  • Allergies
  • Medication
  • Visits

As long as you update the patients’ records diligently after every visit, this patient relationship management system will work for you, although it doesn’t enable you to communicate regularly.

#2: Use a Spreadsheet

A slightly more sophisticated way of keeping records than basic documents, Excel spreadsheets offer data sorting abilities that are useful. You can also keep all your patients’ information in one file, which saves you having to track and open multiple files. Use the worksheet tabs to categorize and group patients by type of illness or some other criteria that’s meaningful to you.

#3: Set Up a Database

There are multiple free and paid database programs available that you can use to set up a patient relationship management system. From Microsoft Office’s Access program through to Apache Open Office’s Baseand the software will not only store the information you add but generate reports, graphs, reminders and a mailing list that you can use with an email marketing program for communication purposes.

#4: Get a CRM Program

Commercial CRM programs such as InTouch CRM and BatchBook enable medical practices to store patient information,communicate via email or text message, and keep track of message opens and click throughs.  A customized CRM program can do the same for your practice. Not only does the program have the ability to store all relevant information about each patient, but you can set up alerts to identify critical changes in the patient’s condition based on data input from one visit to the next – without having to do a manual evaluation.

The patient relationship management program compares current data with data from previous consultations, such as blood pressure readings and cholesterol screening results. If the comparison generates an alert, you can proactively contact the patient to discuss it. At the same time, the system can generate automatic emailing of information to the patient to help educate him.

#5: Implement a Patient Portal

Cream of the crop is the digital patient portal, which enables you to store all information about your patients including test results. Patients get a secure login that lets them view their health records as well as make appointments online or communicate with you via a question facility or a discussion forum. You can set up automated emails based on criteria such as birthdays (personal info), allergies (seasonal) and medication refills needed.

Whatever method you choose to help you with your patient relationship management, keeping the information up to date is vital to enable it to be successful.

Greg FawcettAbout the Author: Greg Fawcett is President of leading North Carolina medical marketing firm Precision Marketing Partners. In this capacity Greg helps healthcare service entities to research their target markets, build their brands and develop creative strategies to reach patients.

Posted in: Amazing Customer Service, Day-to-Day Operations, Innovation, Leadership, Practice Marketing

Leave a Comment (4) →

Ten Golden Rules for Every Medical Practice – A Manage My Practice Classic

Important Rules for Employees

 

Although I originally created this list for medical practices in 2009 and republished it in 2011, I think it still stands true today and applies to all workplace situations.

Sometimes employees do not understand or follow the most basic workplace guidelines. Here is a simple but comprehensive list that you can tweak to make your own. It covers about 25 basics in a short list of ten “Golden Rules.” Make it part of each job description or personnel handbook and/or post it in strategic places.

Report to work on time daily.

Be ready at your desk to begin work at the designated time. Leave promptly for lunch and return to work when you should, unless you’ve made special arrangements with your supervisor. Take breaks on the honor system and do not abuse the privilege. Clock in and out faithfully.

Command respect…

….from the physicians, managers and employees of (your practice/business name here) by demonstrating total professionalism in the workplace with your dress, your demeanor and conversation. Represent the business/practice in a way that would make your Mother and your boss proud of you. Treat your co-workers as you would like to be treated.

Be economical…

…by not wasting time or supplies or doing sloppy work that must be re-done.

Give every customer/patient your total attention, patience and courtesy.

Do not assume you know what the customer/patient is going to say, but listen carefully to the patient (in-person or on the phone) so you can assist them to the best of your ability. Remember how good it feels to be the center of someone’s attention and give that gift to every single patient.

Keep your supervisor aware…

…of any problems in your workload, whether too much or too little. Do not expect your supervisor to know if you are falling behind or caught up.

Document…

…all interactions with customers/patients and other businesses/medical facilities to assist your co-workers in knowing what you have done, and document your resolution of the situation to the customer’s satisfaction.

Strive for a positive attitude every single day.

Don’t whine.

Be a team player.

This means both covering for your co-workers and knowing that they will cover you. This means supporting your co-workers to their faces and behind their backs. This means having (your business/practice name here) goals for your goals, and knowing that your success will be your team’s success, and ultimately, the success of the business/practice.

Clean up your own messes…

…and act as an adult acts in the workplace: responsibly, maturely, and with thought for others. Accept blame for your own mistakes, knowing that everyone makes them, and that if no one is making any mistakes, nothing is improving.

Contribute…

…to making (your business practice name here) a good place to work. Only you can create a place where everyone enjoys working. Only you can make this place a good place to be.

 

For more medical office rules, read 21 Common Sense Rules for Medical Offices.

If you would like to receive Manage My Practice articles via email, click here to subscribe.

(Photo Credit: Gord McKenna via Compfightcc)

Posted in: Amazing Customer Service, Day-to-Day Operations, Human Resources, Manage My Practice Classics

Leave a Comment (9) →

[Guest Post] – 7 Tactics to Improve Patient Retention in Your Medical Practice

Tactics For Retaining Patients in your Medical Practice MarketingAttracting new patients to your practice is one thing, but keeping them can be an entirely different issue. The days when you got to treat all members in a family from the cradle to the grave are long over, and regular attrition is an ongoing concern. You may not be able to avoid losing patients who move from their current location to another city or state, but you can try to avoid losing patients to other medical practices.

From primary care physicians through optometrists and gynecologists, patient retention is an important factor in the success of the practice. Here are 7 tactics you can use to keep your patients coming back for more.

Tactic #1: Think of Your Patients as Clients

Let’s face it, your patients need you probably more than you need them. Far too often, however, medical professionals treat patients as if they are doing them a favor by seeing and treating them. Even if it isn’t true about your practice, how certain are you that your patients feel as if you value them? By thinking of them as clients and fostering a customer service attitude among your practice staff, you can ensure that your patients feel important and cherished. The customer doesn’t always have to be right – he just always has to be king!

(more…)

Posted in: Amazing Customer Service, Day-to-Day Operations, Innovation, Leadership, Practice Marketing, Quality

Leave a Comment (1) →

Explaining the State Health Insurance Exchanges in Seven Minutes: A Video for Your Medical Practice Website

Seven Minutes to Learn About State Insurance Exchanges

I came across this video from the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation and thought “This is exactly the kind of content medical practices can use for their website and social media content.” In this seven-minute video, the “YouToons” learn how the coming healthcare reform will affect them by placing consumers into one of four insurance categories: employer covered, government covered, privately insured, and privately uninsured.

The video is a straightforward, approachable overview of a complicated subject, and would make a fantastic post on the website of a physician or medical office. Even providers without a website could educate patients  by posting this link to Facebook or Twitter, or by including it in an email newsletter. My partner Abraham wrote a primer on talking to patients and staff about reform last July, but this video is even simpler, and is everyone’s favorite – an entertaining movie! It even has clickable icons inside the video for calculating premiums and finding out the status of state health insurance exchanges by state.

Why is a video like this a great piece of content to share with your patients and readers? Here are three reasons:

(more…)

Posted in: Amazing Customer Service, Headlines, Leadership, Medicare & Reimbursement, Practice Marketing, Social Media

Leave a Comment (2) →

Everyone Is Essential: Guest Author Bob Cooper

Obama Fist Bump with JanitorSome organizations will use the terms essential and non-essential workers as a way to distinguish between who needs to be on site in the event of an emergency, and who does not. I do understand the purpose of this distinction, however, it’s very important that businesses not give the impression that some employees are more important or valuable than others. (more…)

Posted in: A Career in Practice Management, Amazing Customer Service, Day-to-Day Operations, Human Resources, Leadership, Quality

Leave a Comment (0) →
Page 1 of 4 1234